What Is Ganoderma Coffee?

Can it really boost your health?

Ganoderma coffee

Verywell / Anastasiia Tretiak​

Ganoderma coffee is a powdered drink mix. It contains instant coffee and the powdered extract of Ganoderma lucidum. That's a medicinal mushroom also known as "reishi" or "Lingzhi."

Other ingredients, such as sugar, non-dairy creamer, and herbs, may also be included.

Proponents say this drink offers a range of health benefits. It's sometimes used by people who want to reduce their coffee intake while still getting an energy boost.

The health benefits of the Ganoderma lucidum mushroom have some scientific support. But Ganoderma coffee hasn't been studied.

This article looks at the claims made about this drink and its possible side effects.

Why Do People Use Ganoderma Coffee?

Proponents claim Ganoderma can:

Ganoderma is also touted as a top source of antioxidants.

Can Ganoderma Coffee Offer Any Benefits?

To date, no scientific studies have tested the health effects of Ganoderma coffee. But preliminary research suggests Ganoderma taken on its own may offer some benefits.

A 2016 review of five studies reported Ganoderma lucidum can stimulate the immune system and enhance the response to tumors.

However, the authors said there wasn't enough evidence to support using it as a primary cancer treatment. Instead, they suggest it as an add-on to conventional treatments.

Research also shows drinking coffee may have some beneficial effects. For example, moderate amounts may lower your risk of some chronic diseases, including:

Some people say Ganoderma lucidum helps with high blood pressure and heart disease. But a 2015 Cochrane review didn't find evidence that it lowers heart disease risk factors in people with type 2 diabetes.

Ganoderma lucidum may also help with energy and fatigue. A 2018 study found that, combined with an antioxidant-rich chicken extract, Ganoderma increased muscle performance and exercise recovery in mice.

Another small study published in 2018 found it reduced fatigue in people with myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS). More research is needed to support these early findings.

Recap

Ganoderma coffee combines coffee with powdered Ganoderma lucidum mushroom. Some people tout health benefits including increased energy, less fatigue, and improved memory.

So far, no studies have been done on the drink mix. Some research on the mushroom is promising for anti-tumor benefits, diabetes, and other chronic conditions. More research is needed.

Possible Side Effects

Little is known about the safety of Ganoderma coffee. It may cause a number of side effects, including:

  • Dizziness
  • Upset stomach
  • Skin irritation

Talk to your healthcare provider before trying Ganoderma coffee, especially if you take blood pressure, anticoagulant, antiplatelet, or cancer medications.

Too much caffeine can:

  • Speed up your heart rate
  • Disrupt your sleep
  • Upset your stomach
  • Aggravate certain mental disorders, like anxiety

A few case reports suggest it's possible to get hepatitis after using Ganoderma lucidum products.

Choosing a Product

Herbal and dietary supplements aren't regulated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) the way prescription drugs are. In some cases, products have been found to contain ingredients not listed on the label. This can lead to harmful effects.

If you choose to use a Ganoderma supplement, look for a product that contains a seal of approval from a third-party organization that provides quality testing. These organizations include:

  • U.S. Pharmacopeia
  • ConsumerLab.com
  • NSF International

A seal of approval from these organizations doesn't guarantee safety or effectiveness. But it does provide assurance that it was properly manufactured, contains the ingredients listed on the label, and doesn't contain harmful levels of contaminants.

Summary

Ganoderma coffee is said to have several health benefits. They've yet to be researched, though.

Early research on the mushroom suggests possible benefits for cancer treatment and other conditions. Not enough is known to say for sure it's safe and effective for any condition.

Ganoderma coffee or mushroom supplements alone may cause unpleasant side effects. These products may not be safe for some people.

If you want to try it, look for products tested by independent labs.

A Word From Verywell

Much research still needs to be done on Ganoderma lucidum and its health effects in large-scale clinical trials. That's the kind of evidence needed before something can be recommended for any medicinal use.

If you want to try Ganoderma coffee, talk to your healthcare provider first to see if it's right for you.

Frequently Asked Questions

  • Can Ganoderma treat cancer?

    Several studies have looked at the potential of Ganoderma. But none have proven the medicinal fungus can benefit people with cancer. Some evidence suggests it might be useful as an immunotherapy treatment. More research is needed, though.

  • Is it safe to drink Ganoderma coffee?

    There isn’t much research on the safety of Ganoderma. Many people may tout its benefits and don’t see a downside. But there've been reports of liver damage and chronic diarrhea from it.

    Ganoderma coffee isn't recommended for people on chemotherapy drugs, blood thinners, or immunosuppressants.

Was this page helpful?
10 Sources
Verywell Health uses only high-quality sources, including peer-reviewed studies, to support the facts within our articles. Read our editorial process to learn more about how we fact-check and keep our content accurate, reliable, and trustworthy.
  1. Sohretoglu D, Huang S. Ganoderma lucidum polysaccharides as an anti-cancer agentAnticancer Agents Med Chem. 2018;18(5):667–674. doi:10.2174/1871520617666171113121246

  2. Jin X, Ruiz beguerie J, Sze DM, Chan GC. Ganoderma lucidum (reishi mushroom) for cancer treatment. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2016;4:CD007731. doi:10.1002/14651858.CD007731.pub3

  3. Harvard Medical School, Harvard Health Publishing. The latest scoop on the health benefits of coffee. September 25, 2017.

  4. Klupp NL, Chang D, Hawke F, et al. Ganoderma lucidum mushroom for the treatment of cardiovascular risk factorsCochrane Database Syst Rev. 2015;(2):CD007259. doi:10.1002/14651858.CD007259.pub2

  5. Li H, Chen YJ, Hsu YJ, et al. Effects of Ganoderma lucidum and ‘essence of dhicken’ on physical fatigue recovery and exercise performance improvement. Chin J Physiol. 2018;61(6):372-383. doi:10.4077/CJP.2018.BAH646

  6. Sokawatmakhin S, Boonyahotra W. Preliminary study of the applications of Ganoderma lucidum in chronic fatigue syndrome. JAASP. 2013;2:262‐268.

  7. Drugs.com. Reishi mushroom. Updated January 3, 2020.

  8. Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. Reishi mushroom. Updated April 12, 2019.

  9. Cao Y, Xu X, Liu S, Huang L, Gu J. Ganoderma: a cancer immunotherapy review. Front Pharmacol. 2018;9:1217. doi:10.3389/fphar.2018.01217

  10. Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. Reishi mushroom. Updated February 5, 2021.