The 8 Best Blood Pressure Monitors of 2022 for Home Use

The Omron Upper Arm Gold Monitor gives quick and accurate measurements

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best blood pressure monitor

Verywell Health / Nick Kova

Blood pressure monitors are an excellent at-home solution for staying on top of your health, especially if you have an underlying condition that requires regular blood pressure readings. We found that the best monitors offer accurate readings, are easy to use, and aren't complicated to fit around your arm.

Tested & Approved

To find the best on the market, we purchased 10 devices certified by the American Medical Association’s Validate BP list and tested them in The Verywell Testing Lab under the guidance and supervision of Huma Sheikh, MD, a neurologist at Mount Sinai in New York City and member of the Verywell Health Medical Expert Board. The eight blood pressure monitors we recommend excelled in our test and provided statistically consistent systolic and diastolic measurements when compared to the baseline readings Dr. Sheikh measured using her own medical-grade device.

Based on our test, these are the best blood pressure monitors available right now.

Best Overall: Omron Upper Arm Gold Blood Pressure Monitor

5
Omron Upper Arm Gold Blood Pressure Monitor

Amazon

Our Ratings
  • Setup
    5/5
  • Fit
    5/5
  • Ease of Use
    5/5
  • Data Display
    5/5
  • Portability
    5/5
Pros
  • Large, clear display

  • Stores 100 data sets per user

  • Results available in under 30 seconds

Cons
  • Only supports two users

  • Bluetooth feature does not provide much additional information

What do buyers say? 90% of 2,900+ Amazon reviewers rated this product 4 stars or above.

When we looked at our most important attributes: ease of use, fit, and data display, the Omron Upper Arm Gold Blood Pressure Monitor received a five out of five in every category. We found that it was not only easy to fit and position on your arm, but it gave extremely clear, straightforward data in less than a minute.

The Omron Gold only requires two steps to set up: insert the four included AA batteries and attach the cuff to the monitor. The cuff itself is large enough to accommodate a range of arm sizes, but the most impressive feature of this device is how straightforward its instructions are. Once the cuff is around your arm, press the start button and wait for about 30 seconds until your blood pressure and heart rate reading appear on the screen.

While this monitor is great for quick readings and taking on the go (it comes with its own carrying case), its Bluetooth feature is a bit clunky and difficult to navigate easily. We ultimately found that was a fair trade off for a device so versatile and easy to use, thus receiving our vote for ‘Best Overall’ blood pressure monitor.

Average Standard Deviations
Systolic: 4.61
Diastolic: 2.01

Price at time of publish: $95

Omron Gold Blood Pressure Monitor

Verywell Health / Nick Kova

Power Source: Batteries or AC adapter | Number of Readings Stored: 100 per user | Number of Users It Can Store Data For: 2 | Weight: 1.6 lbs

What Our Testers Say

“I loved how straightforward the setup and instructions were for this machine. It takes less than 30 seconds to get your blood pressure reading, so it seems like it would be an easy addition to your everyday routine.” — Christina Oehler, Health Commerce Editor and product tester

Best Budget: Omron 3 Series Upper Arm Blood Pressure Monitor

4.3
Omron 3 Series Upper Arm Blood Pressure Monitor

Walmart

Our Ratings
  • Setup
    5/5
  • Fit
    5/5
  • Ease of Use
    5/5
  • Data Display
    3.5/5
  • Portability
    3.5/5
Pros
  • Easy to use

  • One-step setup

  • Cuff fits easily and comfortably onto arm

Cons
  • No carrying case included

  • Only stores 14 readings at a time

For users who want to regularly check their blood pressure without additional bells and whistles, this blood pressure monitor checked all of the necessary boxes while staying in an affordable price range. Its one-step setup allows users to quickly assemble and test the device right out of the box, and shares results with large, easy-to-read letters. The cuff is comfortable and easy to put on, and the box provides illustrated instructions on how to properly fit the cuff around your arm.

Because it isn’t a very elaborate device, you don’t get a lot of data storage — the machine only holds 14 readings, so if you need to regularly monitor your blood pressure, this probably isn’t the device for you. Because of this shortcoming, we gave this device a 3.5 out of five in terms of data display.

If you’re just looking to check your blood pressure at home from time to time and still want a quality device without a high price tag, the Omron 3 Series is a great budget-friendly pick. While it received a perfect score in setup, fit, and ease of use, its 3.5 scores for data display and portability ultimately brought down its overall score to a four out of five.

Average Standard Deviations
Systolic: 6.71
Diastolic: 3.02

Price at time of publish: $56

Omron 3 Blood Pressure Monitor

Verywell Health / Nick Kova

Power Source: Batteries | Number of Readings Stored: 14 | Number of Users It Can Store Data For: 1 | Weight: 1.2 lbs

What Our Testers Say

“This is a great no-frills blood pressure monitor, however it's not ideal for people who need to track their readings over time or plan to track and store readings for more than one person.” — Ashleigh Morley, Health Commerce Editorial Director and product tester

Best Data Storage: Microlife Watch BP Home

4.6
Microlife Watch BP Home

Steeles

Our Ratings
  • Setup
    4/5
  • Fit
    5/5
  • Ease of Use
    5/5
  • Data Display
    4/5
  • Portability
    5/5
Pros
  • Stores 250 data sets

  • Cuff fits easily and comfortably onto arm

Cons
  • Screen displays excessive data that may be confusing to user

  • Slight learning curve to understanding the device

If you’re investing in a quality blood pressure monitor, you’re likely going to want to get plenty of uses out of it. The Microlife Watch BP Home Blood Pressure Monitor stores up to 250 blood pressure readings, so you can track your vitals over time. The device is easy to set up and only requires plugging the cuff into the monitor itself. The cuff, which has instructions for use printed on the outside, stays put once positioned on your arm.

Once you’ve taken your reading, the monitor automatically stores the data and previous readings can be accessed by the “M” button on the machine. It offers a Diagnostic Mode for people whose doctors put them on a 7-day self-monitoring program, and can detect A-Fib.

Our testers said that the one downside to this machine is that it provides more information than necessary on its display. The screen shows the date, battery life, and various other icons that could be confusing to an inexperienced user, though it provides plenty of information for anyone who prefers that level of detail. We gave this device a point a four out of five for data display, but because it received five out of five in every other category, we gave the Microlife Watch BP a 4.5 out of five for overall value.

Average Standard Deviations
Systolic: 3.05
Diastolic: 2.49

Price at time of publish: $100

Microlife Blood Pressure Monitor

Verywell Health / Nick Kova

Power Source: Batteries | Number of Readings Stored: 250 | Number of Users It Can Store Data For: 1 | Weight: .8 lbs

What Our Testers Say

“This device was straightforward to set up and use, and I like that it automatically stored all of my measurements, and averaged them out for me. The display size is large and easy to read, and it has a clock on it, so I could easily space out measurements.” — Nicole Kwan, Verywell Health Editorial Director and product tester

Best with App: Omron 5 Series Wireless Upper Arm Blood Pressure Monitor

4.4
Omron 5 Series Wireless Upper Arm Blood Pressure Monitor

Walmart

Our Ratings
  • Setup
    5/5
  • Fit
    5/5
  • Ease of Use
    5/5
  • Data Display
    3.5/5
  • Portability
    3.5/5
Pros
  • Easy to set up and connect to app

  • Large, clear display

  • Gives average of multiple readings

Cons
  • Gives diagnosis-level analysis

  • No carrying case included

If you’re looking for a little more context when analyzing your blood pressure, a blood pressure monitor with a connected app can give you a more thorough look into your blood pressure reading trends. The Omron 5 Series Upper Arm Blood Pressure Monitor provides users with both straightforward readings on the device as well as an in-depth look at their results in the Connect Omron app.

The device is easy to set up and attach to your arm, and it comes with clear, illustrated instructions on how to properly position the cuff for accurate results. Once you’ve taken your reading, which can be done with the push of a single button, your data will appear in large, easy-to-read numbers on the monitor and will automatically sync to the paired app.

The app will analyze your results and tell you whether your blood pressure is abnormal or in a healthy range. This feature, however, hurt the device when it came to rating its overall value. If one of the numbers is even on the cusp of elevation, the screen will show an icon that says "high", but doesn't give much indication about why or what "high" means and the instructions don't go out of their way to explain this number. Despite receiving fives for setup, fit, and data display, its over analysis of the data brought down its overall value score to a 4.5 out of five.

Average Standard Deviations
Systolic: 2.5
Diastolic: 1.65

Price at time of publish: $52

Omron 5 Series Wireless Upper Arm Blood Pressure Monitor

Verywell Health / Nick Kova

Power Source: Batteries or AC adapter | Maximum Readings Stored on Device: 60 | Number of Users It Can Store Data For: 1 | Weight: 1.4 lbs

What Our Testers Say

“The app flagged my 115/83 reading as "Hypertension Stage 1". After talking with Dr. Sheikh, this isn't truly accurate and could cause patients to get anxious about readings being perceived as unhealthy when you should really consult your doctor or physician about your readings.” — Ashleigh Morley, Health Commerce Editorial Director and product tester

Best Data Display: Omron Platinum Blood Pressure Monitor

4.6
OMRON Platinum Blood Pressure Monitor

Courtesy of Amazon

Our Ratings
  • Setup
    5/5
  • Fit
    5/5
  • Ease of Use
    4/5
  • Data Display
    5/5
  • Portability
    4.5/5
Pros
  • Large, clear display

  • Stores 200 data sets per user

  • Carrying case included

Cons
  • Machine sensitivity makes it prone to error messages

  • Slight learning curve to understanding the device

Omron’s Platinum Wireless Blood Pressure Monitor has a display that stood out during our testing. We rated this device a five out of five for data display because the letters were large and easy to read, and the device’s backlit screen makes the data stand out in both light and dark settings. The screen shows your two most recent blood pressure readings, so you can compare data quickly. Additionally, the device is easy to connect to its paired app, which stores 200 readings per user (for two users).

Our testers said this device was incredibly easy to set up—plug the cuff into the device and you’re ready to take your reading. Our testers noted that the Omron Platinum is incredibly sensitive to movement, so movement during a reading will trigger an error message. It took a few trials to figure this out; the machine did not explicitly say that the added movement caused the error message to appear. Because of this, we scored this machine a four out of five for ease of use, bringing its overall value rating down slightly to 4.5 out of five.

Average Standard Deviations
Systolic: 7.53
Diastolic: 3.89

Price at time of publish: $84

Omron Platinum Blood Pressure Monitor

Verywell Health / Nick Kova

Power Source: Batteries or AC adapter | Maximum Readings Stored on Device: 200 | Number of Users It Can Store Data For: 2 | Weight: 1.01 lbs

Best with Talking Feature: A&D Premier Talking Blood Pressure Monitor

5
A&D Premier Talking Blood Pressure Monitor

Amazon

Our Ratings
  • Setup
    5/5
  • Fit
    5/5
  • Ease of Use
    5/5
  • Data Display
    5/5
  • Portability
    5/5
Pros
  • Loud, clear speaker

  • Carrying case included

  • Available in 3 languages

Cons
  • Dim screen

The A&D Premier Talking Blood Pressure Monitor is another great option for visually impaired users. This blood pressure monitor features an audio setting that reads out instructions, results, and a brief data analysis in English, Spanish, or French.

Our testers said that the setup for this device was simple, and the cuff fits nicely and can accommodate upper arms with a diameter between 9 and 14.6 inches. The talking function activates at the push of the start button, and guides the user throughout the process while also displaying the results on the device’s screen.

The monitor’s screen isn’t well lit, so it might be hard to see results in darker settings. That being said, it overcompensates for this through its talking feature, so you’ll be able to get your results regardless. The device’s perfect five out of five scores in every attribute resulted in a five out of five overall value score.

Average Standard Deviations
Systolic: 5.84
Diastolic: 4.2

Price at time of publish: $81

A&D Premier Talking Blood Pressure Monitor

Verywell Health / Nick Kova

Power Source: Batteries or AC adapter | Maximum Readings Stored on Device: 90 | Number of Users It Can Store Data For: 1 | Weight: .66 lbs

What Our Testers Say

“It’s good for a beginner and the manual is very easy to understand. The manual explains what blood pressure is, and the speaker is clear, loud, and easy to understand.” — Marie Paulemey, Retired Registered Nurse and product tester

Best Fit: Welch Allyn Home Blood Pressure Monitor 1700 Series with SureBP Technology

4.1
Welch Allyn Home Blood Pressure Monitor 1700 Series

Hopkins Medical

Our Ratings
  • Setup
    5/5
  • Fit
    4.5/5
  • Ease of Use
    5/5
  • Data Display
    5/5
  • Portability
    3/5
Pros
  • Ready to use out of box

  • Connected app is easy to navigate

Cons
  • No carrying case included

We loved the fit of this monitor’s cuff, which holds its cylindrical shape at all times and makes it easy to fit properly onto your arm. This makes it great for those with limited mobility and keeps setup quick and fuss-free.

The connected app is another great feature of this device: it stores multiple readings, indicates irregularity in readings, and is easy to connect to quickly. Data taken on the monitor uploads immediately to the app, so you get real-time feedback as you take your measurements.

While the monitor itself is lightweight, it doesn’t come with a carrying case which might make it harder to travel with when needed. Because of this aspect, we gave this device a three out of five for portability and a four out of five for overall value.

Average Standard Deviations
Systolic: 8.01
Diastolic: 1.99

Price at time of publish: $152

Welch Allyn Blood Pressure Monitor

Verywell Health / Nick Kova

Power Source: Batteries or AC adapter | Maximum Readings Stored on Device: 99 | Number of Users It Can Store Data For: 1 | Weight: 1.2 lbs

Best One-Piece Design: Omron Evolv Wireless Upper Arm Blood Pressure Monitor BP7000

4.3
Omron
Our Ratings
  • Setup
    4/5
  • Fit
    3.5/5
  • Ease of Use
    4/5
  • Data Display
    5/5
  • Portability
    5/5
Pros
  • Sleek, lightweight design

  • Connected app is easy to navigate

Cons
  • One-piece feature makes it hard to read results

  • Can take two people to properly adjust onto arm

When it comes to sleek, polished designs, this blood pressure monitor takes the cake. Its cuff-and-monitor one piece design makes it perfect for travel and easy to store. The device has a connected app that can hold 100 readings, so you can compare your blood pressure overtime and review your reading trends at the tip of your fingers.

Because of its sleek, two-in-one design, blood pressure readings can be hard to read on the device, which resulted in a 3.5 out of five fit score and a four out of five setup score. Our testers said that it was difficult to effectively position the blood pressure monitor correctly without the help of another person, since you have to hold the device in place while securing the strap. But once it’s strapped on, it’s smooth sailing to get a quick reading.

Average Standard Deviations
Systolic: 7.64
Diastolic: 4.5

Price at time of publish: $98

Omron Evolv Blood Pressure Monitor

Verywell Health / Nick Kova

Power Source: Batteries | Maximum Readings Stored on Device: 100 | Number of Users It Can Store Data For: 2 | Weight: .5 lbs

Compare

Overall Rating Setup Fit Ease of Use Data Display Portability
Omron Upper Arm Gold Blood Pressure Monitor
Best Overall:
Omron Upper Arm Gold Blood Pressure Monitor
5
5 5 5 5 5
Omron 3 Series Upper Arm Blood Pressure Monitor
Best Budget:
Omron Upper Arm Blood Pressure Monitor
4.3
5 5 5 3.5 3.5
Microlife Watch BP Home
Best Data Storage:
Microlife Watch BP Home
4.6
4 5 5 4 5
Omron 5 Series Wireless Upper Arm Blood Pressure Monitor
Best with App:
Omron Wireless Blood Pressure Monitor
4.4
5 5 5 3.5 3.5
OMRON Platinum Blood Pressure Monitor
Best Data Display:
Omron Platinum Blood Pressure Monitor
4.6
5 5 4 5 4.5
A&D Premier Talking Blood Pressure Monitor
Best with Talking Feature:
A&D Talking Blood Pressure Monitor
5
5 5 5 5 5
Welch Allyn Home Blood Pressure Monitor 1700 Series
Best Fit:
Welch Allyn Home Blood Pressure Monitor
4.1
5 4.5 5 5 3
Omron
Best One-Piece Design:
Omron Evolv
4.3
4 3.5 4 5 5

Final Verdict

When it comes to finding an accurate, easy-to-use blood pressure monitor, our favorite was the Omron Gold Blood Pressure Monitor. It gives you quick, clear results that are easy to read and comes with a carrying case for on-the-go use. For those who want to track their health data over a long period of time, the Microlife Watch BP Home stores over 250 readings that can be accessed through an easy-to-navigate app.

Best Blood Pressure Monitors

Brianna Gilmartin / Verywell

How We Rated the Blood Pressure Monitors

4.8 to 5 stars: These are the best blood pressure monitors we tested. We recommend them without reservation.

4.5 to 4.7 stars: These blood pressure monitors are excellent—they might have minor flaws, but we still recommend them.

4.0 to 4.5 stars: We think these are great blood pressure monitors, but others are better.

3.5 to 3.9 stars: These blood pressure monitors are just average.

3.4 and below: We don't recommend blood pressure monitors with this rating; you won't find any on our list.

Blood pressure monitor testing

Verywell Health / Nick Kova

Blood Pressure Monitors We Also Tested

In our Lab test, we evaluated 10 blood pressure monitors, but only included eight on our final list of recommendations. While these two devices fell short in our test when it came to ease of use and delivery of results, they had some helpful features and may be worth considering if none of the monitors on our list are exactly what you're looking for.

How We Tested the Blood Pressure Monitors

The Verywell Health team tested 10 blood pressure monitors at The Verywell Testing Lab to see how they performed amongst a few key attributes, including setup, fit, accuracy, ease of use, data display, portability, and value. We chose these attributes because we believe that they are most aligned with the priorities of someone shopping for a blood pressure. All of the products we tested have been validated by the American Medical Association.

Our five testers, which included three Verywell Health editors and a nurse practitioner, tested 10 blood pressure monitors over the course of eight hours. Following the American Heart Association’s guidelines for blood pressure monitor use, we asked our testers to fast for 30 minutes before both the morning and afternoon tests. These are the recommended times to take blood pressure readings, so we scheduled our day accordingly. Additionally, each tester sat with both feet on the ground and fit the cuff around their bare upper arm for every test.

Blood pressure monitor testing

Verywell Health / Nick Kova

Our test began with Dr. Sheikh, a neurologist and Verywell Medical Expert Board member, taking a baseline blood pressure reading for each tester. After the baseline readings were recorded, our testers rested for 10 minutes before attaching the designated monitor to their right arms and getting a first reading. Once the first reading was recorded, our testers waited another 5 minutes before taking a second reading. The same process was repeated on the left arm immediately after. All products were then retested in the afternoon, using the same methodology as the morning test.

Blood pressure monitor testing

Verywell Health / Nick Kova

A Note About Accuracy

Because blood pressure can fluctuate greatly in response to movement, medication, and other factors, we decided we did not have the resources to give a valid accuracy rating. Instead, we determined each device’s “reading consistency”.

We calculated the standard deviation of the back-to-back systolic and diastolic readings on each device. We did this for both the morning and afternoon tests; we've included the average standard deviations for each device listed above. Dr. Sheikh advised that devices with standard deviation readings of 10 or less would be considered consistent. Devices with standard deviations greater than 10 did not make our list.

Throughout both tests, the testers took thorough notes on how the cuff fit around their arm, how easy the results were to access and understand, whether or not the device was easily portable, any other features that would either lessen or enhance the device’s value. They then scored the product for these attributes on a scale of one to five (five being the ideal rating).

What to Look for in a Blood Pressure Monitor

Fit

The AHA recommends an automatic, cuff-style, bicep (upper-arm) monitor. They advise against using a wrist and finger monitor as they yield less reliable readings. The most important thing is to measure around your upper arm and choose a monitor that comes with the correct size cuff. Additionally, if you struggle with have limited mobility, a cuff that keeps its shape and doesn't require a lot of strength to wrap around your arm.

Ease of Use

When looking for a blood pressure monitor, you'll want to opt for one that fits your lifestyle. If you're tech-savvy, you might want to consider going with a model that includes features like Bluetooth, app connectivity, and ample storage for readings. For others, that might not be the best option. If you're not someone who regularly uses a smartphone and would rather use a simple, no-frills design, consider the device's setup and use instructions to guarantee it fits your lifestyle.

Blood pressure monitor testing

Verywell Health / Nick Kova

Data Display

When shopping for a blood pressure monitor, take your vision and preferred method of data display into consideration. You'll want to find a monitor that displays large, bright readings, or one that can easily pair to an app. Additionally, if you're purchasing your monitor for multiple users, take data storage into consideration. Some monitors will simply give you a reading or only store a handful of readings for single users, while others can store dozens of readings and track your progress on an app. If you want to regularly share your blood pressure readings with your doctor, look for a device that will store multiple readings.

Portability

If your doctor has recommended that you take your blood pressure every day, you'll want to find a device that is easy to tote around, particularly for those who travel often. We recommend looking for a lightweight device, and ideally, a device that comes with a carrying case.

Frequently Asked Questions

  • How accurate are at home blood pressure monitors?

    The ultimate indicator for whether a blood pressure device has the necessary requirements to give an accurate reading is if it’s validated or not. The American Heart Association (AHA) recommends patients purchase a device that’s been validated by experts.

    In collaboration with AHA and the American Medical Association (AMA), Target BP created a list of validated devices online to assist people in selecting a device that will give them an accurate reading. “The goal was to create an unbiased resource for both patients and physicians that would aid in the selection of a home blood pressure monitor,” says Dr. C. Adair Blyler, a clinical pharmacist and hypertension expert in the Smidt Heart Institute at Cedars-Sinai in Los Angeles. These devices have been validated for “clinical accuracy” by an Independent Review Committee of experts. “Given that there are so many BP monitors on the market, I recommend that people consult a list like this to determine if the monitor they are buying is indeed accurate,” Dr Blyler adds. If you’re unsure about your own device, you can also check it with your physician.

  • How do you read a blood pressure monitor?

    To understand if someone’s blood pressure is too high or too low, they need to use a device like a blood pressure monitor. There are two numbers to pay attention to when reading a monitor: systolic blood pressure (the first number) and diastolic blood pressure (the second number). Systolic blood pressure indicates how much pressure your blood exudes against the artery walls when the heart beats. Diastolic blood pressure, in comparison, indicates how much pressure your blood exudes against the artery walls when the heart is at rest.

    The American Heart Association created a helpful chart that details the range of these numbers and what they could mean. If your systolic blood pressure is less than 120 mmHg and your diastolic blood pressure is less than 80 mmHg, then the reading is normal. Otherwise, there are multiple stages of high blood pressure to pay attention to when taking a reading. Consult with this chart when reading your blood pressure to best understand the reading.

  • Should your blood pressure reading be the same on both arms?

    Your blood pressure should not read differently between the right and left arms, but sometimes there may be a blockage. Therefore, “checking the blood pressure on both arms would be helpful,” she suggests. “Some cuffs on the market can be used on both arms, which will allow you to check the blood pressure on both arms.”

    If each arm presents different numbers, talk to your doctor to make sure you're getting an accurate reading from your monitor.

  • How much do blood pressure monitors cost?

    You can expect to pay between $50-100 for a quality blood pressure monitor. You might see cheaper devices available, but they might require you to manually inflate the cuff or provide less data storage. More expensive options may include additional bells and whistles that you really don't need (or do more than measure your blood pressure). The cheapest device on our list is often available for less than $50, while our top recommendation, the Omron Upper Arm Gold Blood Pressure Monitor was $95 when we published this list.

Why Trust Verywell Health

Christina Oehler is the commerce editor for Verywell Health and has an RYT-200 Certification. She previously worked as an assistant editor for Health magazine. While testing blood pressure monitors at The Lab, she focused on the integrity of the test and created a methodology that helped thoroughly review the products through the eyes of a buyer. Christina conducted side-by-side comparisons of each blood pressure monitor and consulted a neurologist for the best techniques to get the most thorough insights to provide to buyers.

Additional reporting to this story by Danielle Zoellner

As a seasoned health writer, Danielle Zoellner knows the importance of finding just the right product to fit your medical needs. Throughout her career, Danielle has interviewed a variety of experts in the medical and health fields while reviewing dozens of products. Her experience and knowledge in the field work together to help readers like yourself find the best products for your daily life.

5 Sources
Verywell Health uses only high-quality sources, including peer-reviewed studies, to support the facts within our articles. Read our editorial process to learn more about how we fact-check and keep our content accurate, reliable, and trustworthy.
  1. US Blood Pressure Validated Device Listing.

  2. American Heart Association. Monitoring Your Blood Pressure at Home.

  3. American Heart Association. Monitoring your blood pressure at home.

  4. US Blood Pressure Validated Device Listing. BP devices.

  5. American Heart Association. Understanding blood pressure readings.