The 9 Best Fiber Supplements of 2020, According to a Dietitian

Boost digestion and meet your daily fiber requirements

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First Look

Best Overall: Garden of Life Dr. Formulated Organic Fiber at Amazon

"The clear, unflavored powder is free of psyllium, gluten, dairy, and soy."

Best Budget: Benefiber On-the-Go Sticks at Amazon

"Convenient, budget-friendly fiber supplement that packs three grams of fiber into a slim, easy-to-use stick."

Best Natural: Navitas Organics Chia Seeds at Amazon

"One tablespoon provides three grams of dietary fiber, two grams of plant-based protein, and 2254 milligrams of omega-3s."

Best for Constipation: NOW Supplements Psyllium Husk Powder at Amazon

"A premium-quality fiber supplement that improves bowel regularity."

Best for Diarrhea: Heather's Tummy Fiber Organic Acacia Senegal at Amazon

"Absorbs excess fluid like a sponge and slows down the passage of stool through your intestines."

Best for IBS: Organic India Whole Husk Psyllium at Amazon

"Made from 98% pure extra white psyllium, the highest grade psyllium available on the market."

Best to Help Lower Cholesterol: Metamucil Sugar Free Original Smooth Powder at walgreens.com

"An inexpensive option to help lower your cholesterol count."

Best for Keto: Renew Life Organic Clear Fiber 100% Acacia Fiber Powder at vitaminshoppe.com

"Certified Organic fiber supplement with zero net carbs per serving and no sugar."

Best Capsules: Renew Life Fiber Smart at vitaminshoppe.com

"Contains gut-health promoting probiotics, and herbs including fennel seed, Slippery Elm, and Triphala."

Many Americans do not meet their daily fiber needs. According to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, the recommended amount of dietary fiber is approximately 25 grams per day for women and 38 grams per day for men. A healthy, balanced diet rich in high-fiber fruits, vegetables, and whole grains is the best way to meet your fiber needs; however, a fiber supplement can help to boost your intake. 

There are two types of fiber: soluble fiber and insoluble fiber. Soluble fiber dissolves in water, forming a gel-like consistency that can help to lower cholesterol and blood glucose levels. True to its name, insoluble fiber doesn’t dissolve in water but bulks stool and balances intestinal pH levels. Fiber supplements contain one or both of these fibers to help improve digestion, and many incorporate other complementary ingredients. There are various types of fiber supplements—including powder, capsules, chewable tablets, and even functional foods that contain naturally-occurring fiber—that can help you to meet your daily goals.

Here, the best fiber supplements.

Our Top Picks

Best Overall: Garden of Life Dr. Formulated Organic Fiber

An excellent fiber supplement contains a mix of soluble and insoluble fiber, is free of sugar, taste, and color, and is made using top-quality organic ingredients. Garden of Life’s Dr. Formulated Fiber supplement meets all the criteria for the highest quality, best all-around fiber supplement.

Formulated by Dr. David Perlmutter, an expert in the human microbiome and a board-certified neurologist, the USDA Organic fiber is specifically designed to feed beneficial gut bacteria and support an overall healthy digestive system. Each tablespoon provides five grams of prebiotic fiber (four grams soluble fiber and one gram insoluble fiber) from Acacia Senegal fiber, orange peel, baobab fruit, apple peel, and cranberry.

The clear, unflavored powder is free of psyllium, gluten, dairy, and soy. The non-GMO blend gently supports digestion and occasional constipation. Research shows that acacia fiber produces a more substantial amount of healthy bacteria—including bifidobacteria and lactobacilli—than comparable fibers, and results in fewer side effects such as bloating and gas. It's also Certified Vegan, NSF-Certified Gluten-Free, and kosher.

Best Budget: Benefiber On-the-Go Sticks

If you're looking for a convenient, budget-friendly fiber supplement, Benefiber On-the-Go Sticks pack three grams of fiber into a slim, easy-to-use stick. Benefiber uses wheat dextrin, a soluble fiber that lowers cholesterol, to up your fiber intake. It also contains prebiotics that can improve the overall health of your digestive system. Benefiber is 100% clear and dissolves quickly in water or other drinks.

Simply add the powder from one stick to four to eight ounces of your favorite hot or cold food or beverage. The sugar-free, tasteless powder dissolves well and doesn't thicken or change the texture of your drink. Although Benefiber is derived from wheat, it is labeled gluten-free per the FDA definition of less than 20 parts per million of gluten. Benefiber states that all of their powders contain less than 20 parts per million of gluten; however, the company recommends that anyone with gluten intolerance should not consume Benefiber unless consulting with their doctor.

Best Natural: Navitas Organics Chia Seeds

If you prefer a more holistic, functional food as opposed to a typical fiber supplement, chia seeds are an excellent option for you. One tablespoon of Navitas Organic's USDA Organic chia seeds provides three grams of dietary fiber, two grams of plant-based protein, and 2254 milligrams of omega-3s. The small, but mighty seeds are known for their ability to absorb up to 15 times their weight in water, which helps them to form a gel-like consistency and ease constipation.

The superfood contains mostly soluble fiber and can help to reduce LDL cholesterol and slow digestion, which helps to promote blood sugar stability and satiety after a meal. Note that these powerful seeds do contain more calories than typical calorie-free or low-calorie fiber supplements: one tablespoon is 60 calories. They're also kosher, non-GMO, vegan, and gluten-free.

Best for Constipation: NOW Supplements Psyllium Husk Powder

If you’re struggling with constipation, you’ll want to go for an insoluble fiber supplement. Insoluble fiber adds bulk to your stool and helps it pass through your digestive system more quickly. Psyllium husk is a form of soluble fiber, which means it absorbs water from your stomach and intestines, then turns into a gel consistency. It's easy on the intestines in appropriate doses and can increase your bowel frequency without causing diarrhea.

NOW Supplement’s Psyllium Husk powder is a premium-quality fiber supplement that improves bowel regularity. The non-GMO Project Verified powder simple to take—just mix one tablespoon into 12 ounces of water every day. One tablespoon provides seven grams of dietary fiber, including six grams of soluble fiber and one gram of insoluble fiber. It also contains 8% of your daily iron needs. For an even tastier dose of fiber, bake NOW’s powder into homemade muffins, soups, and smoothies.

Good to Know

When increasing dietary fiber, be sure to increase fluid intake as well. Fiber absorbs water, which helps to add bulk to stool, making elimination easier. This water comes from what you drink and your body's fluid reserves. If you're not consuming enough water with fiber-rich foods and fiber supplements, you are more likely to become dehydrated, which can worsen constipation. Plus, if you don't drink fluid as directed with your fiber supplement, the added bulk of a fiber supplement can create intestinal discomfort or potentially swell in your throat, making it difficult to swallow.

Best for Diarrhea: Heather's Tummy Fiber Organic Acacia Senegal

Soluble fiber is helpful for people with diarrhea. It absorbs excess fluid like a sponge and slows down the passage of stool through your intestines. Acacia Senegal, the type of fiber in Heather's Tummy Fiber, has been shown to reduce diarrhea.

Heather's Tummy Fiber is especially helpful for those with diarrhea, as the fiber naturally slows fermentation, which can help to decrease painful bloating and gas. Unlike synthetic soluble fiber supplements, the product is made up of only one ingredient: organic acacia powder. It's free of gluten, insoluble fiber, stimulants, citric acid, and artificial ingredients.

It dissolves well in room temperature water or your favorite beverage. You can even mix it into your favorite recipe to meet your daily fiber goals. An added bonus? The whole food fiber contains prebiotics—or the food source for gut-healthy probiotics—and can be used to relieve constipation.

Best for IBS: Organic India Whole Husk Psyllium

Irritable bowel syndrome, or IBS, is a functional disorder of the colon that can result in uncomfortable and painful symptoms, including constipation, diarrhea, cramping, and bloating. Research shows that fiber supplementation—especially with psyllium—is safe and effective for improving IBS symptoms. In fact, the American College of Gastroenterology recommends psyllium for the overall improvement of symptoms in IBS patients.

Organic India's USDA Organic, Non-GMO Project Verified whole husk psyllium fiber is cultivated on sustainable, organic farmland to create the highest quality product possible. It's made from 98 percent pure extra white psyllium, the highest grade psyllium available on the market. Each tablespoon contains four grams of dietary fiber—three grams soluble and one gram insoluble—with no additives. The company recommends mixing one tablespoon with at least ten ounces of fluid and drinking an extra glass of water afterward to ensure adequate hydration.

Best to Help Lower Cholesterol: Metamucil Sugar Free Original Smooth Powder

Metamucil 4-in-1 Fiber
Courtesy of Walgreens.com.

If you have high cholesterol, fiber supplements are an inexpensive option to help lower your cholesterol count. If you’re not getting enough from your diet, a supplement like Metamucil that's rich in psyllium fiber can add soluble fiber to your daily regimen.

Metamucil Sugar Free Original Smooth powder contains three grams of fiber, including two grams of soluble fiber, per teaspoon. The unflavored, sugar-free option is free of added sweeteners and colors. Metamucil recommends adults mix one to two rounded teaspoons with at least eight ounces of cool liquid.

Best for Keto: Renew Life Organic Clear Fiber 100% Acacia Fiber Powder

Renew Life Organic Clear Prebiotic Fiber
Courtesy of Vitaminshoppe.com.

The low-carb, sugar-free keto diet is generally very low in dietary fiber, which can lead to uncomfortable side effects such as constipation and gas. Finding a fiber supplement that meets the strict criteria of the diet can be a challenge; however, acacia fiber is usually a good choice.

Renew Life's Organic Clear Fiber powder is a Certified Organic fiber supplement with zero net carbs per serving and no sugar, making it keto-friendly. The natural soluble fiber dissolves completely in soft foods and liquids, so it's perfect for boosting low-carb cooking and baking. Each tablespoon of the tasteless powder provides five grams of soluble fiber and only ten calories. It's free of gluten, dairy, soy, and artificial ingredients.

Best Capsules: Renew Life Fiber Smart

RenewLife Fiber Smart Capsules
Courtesy of Vitaminshoppe.com.

If you're not a fan of powders, or simply prefer a less mess formula, a fiber supplement in capsule form may be best for you. Renew Life's Fiber Smart capsules combine flaxseed, L-glutamine, herbs, and probiotics to promote regularity and support digestive health.

Each four capsule serving contains ten calories with one gram of dietary fiber that's 30 percent soluble fiber and 70 percent insoluble fiber. It also contains gut-health promoting probiotics, and herbs including fennel seed, Slippery Elm, and Triphala.

The vegetarian capsules are gluten-free and soy-free but do contain traces of milk from the fermentation media. If you want the same formula in powder form, Renew Life makes a Fiber Smart powder.

What to Look for in a Fiber Supplement

Type of Fiber: Depending on why you are considering using a fiber supplement, you may want to choose a supplement that contains only soluble or insoluble fiber, or a combination of both. Soluble fiber may be best for lowering cholesterol and relieving diarrhea, whereas insoluble fiber works well to alleviate constipation. A blend of soluble and insoluble fibers may be helpful for general digestive health.

Ingredients: Avoid fiber supplements that contain artificial ingredients and colors. Some products contain herbs or complementary components such as probiotics. Always check the ingredient label to see exactly what is in the supplement. When possible, choose a USDA Organic or non-GMO Project Verified product.

Form: Most fiber supplements come in powder form. If you're not a fan of powder or want a more portable option, there are various tablets, capsules, and gummies on the market.

Dosage: When considering adding a fiber supplement to your daily routine, consult with your health care provider about the appropriate product and dosage for your individual needs. Follow the dosage instructions recommended by your health care provider or the product they recommend. In general, it is best to start with a low dose and adjust if appropriate. Always increase fiber gradually, and with extra fluids.

What Experts Say

"Fiber is an important nutrient for both overall health and the health of the digestive system. It's best to get fiber through food first; however, when an individual is not able to meet their fiber requirement through diet alone, a fiber supplement may be beneficial. Both soluble fiber and insoluble fiber contribute to our general digestive health by helping to move waste and toxins out of the body. Additionally, bacteria in the gut ferment fiber and produce short-chain fatty acids, an important source of energy for the cells in the colon."—Merrill Brady, MS, RDN, CDN

Why Trust Verywell Health

A personal note on my recommendations written above. As a dietitian, I am careful to recommend supplements. In writing this article, I spent time reviewing the most current clinical research on fiber supplementation, including soluble fibers, insoluble fiber, and optimal dosage. I also looked at multiple products and brands and consulted with trusted peers in dietetics. I believe the fiber supplements in the round-up are made by trusted brands and are composed of high-quality ingredients. — Eliza Savage, MS, RD, CDN

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