The 9 Best Scrubs, According to Healthcare Workers

The Dagacci Medical Scrubs Set is comfortable and offers a wide range of sizes

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The 9 Best Scrubs, According to Healthcare Workers

Verywell / Sabrina Jiang

Scrubs are not only uniform in the healthcare industry, but they can help nurses and doctors stay comfortable while keeping contaminants contained.

Reviewed & Approved

The Dagacci Medical Uniform Top and Pants Scrubs Set are lightweight, breathable, and come in a variety of sizes. If you're looking to invest in your scrubs wardrobe, FIGS High Waisted Zamora Scrub Pants are stylish and stand up to wear and tear.

“As healthcare providers, we’re very busy and need scrubs that work as hard as we do,” says Kristen Schiefer, MSPA, PA-C, board-certified physician assistant in pediatric neurosurgery. Not only should scrubs be comfortable, but they should also be "good quality, durable scrubs that are made to last.” We researched dozens of scrubs and evaluated them based on the following attributes: material, cost, breathability, size availability, and fit.

Here are the best scrubs on the market today.

Best Overall: Dagacci Medical Uniform Top and Pants Scrubs Set

4.8
Dagacci Scrubs Medical Uniform

Courtesy of Amazon

Pros
  • Wide range of sizes

  • Affordable

  • Multiple pockets

Cons
  • Unisex sizing can make it hard to find the right size

  • Roomy fit may be unflattering 

What do buyers say? 72% of 39,800+ Amazon reviewers rated this product 4 stars or above.

An important characteristic to look for in the perfect pair of clothes is a lightweight fabric that will be breathable and moveable throughout the entire work shift. The Dagacci Medical Uniform Scrub Set is made of a 100% polyester cotton blend, which is lightweight and soft against the skin. Additionally, the scrubs come equipped with several functional pockets that make it easy for anyone to store what they need while working a shift. 

The scrubs also come in a variety of colors and an inclusive size range from x-small to 5x-large, making it an option for a variety of people. Not only do these scrubs have a comfortable fit, but they're machine washable and low maintenance to care for.

Material: 100% polyester cotton blend | Fit: Classic v-neck, loose, unisex | Wash Recommendations: Machine wash cold, tumble dry

Best Budget: Just Love Women's Scrub Sets Six Pocket Medical Scrubs

Just Love Scrubs
Pros
  • Functional drawstring waist

  • Several color options

  • Comfortable blended fabric

Cons
  • Fabric isn’t as durable as other brands

  • Runs large and baggy 

Purchasing scrubs for work can get expensive, especially if you need multiple pairs to survive the workweek. Furthermore, the cost of scrubs can increase if you have to purchase the pants and top separately. But the Just Love Six Pocket Medical Scrubs make the process affordable and comes in a variety of comfortable options. The scrubs are made out of 55% cotton and 45% polyester–a blend that should feel soft and comfortable against the skin. The scrubs, which come in a V-neck top and drawstring pants, also come with a variety of pockets that can fit different supplies to last a shift. 

Although the scrubs are budget-friendly, it is important to note that this pair tends to fit looser against the body—so a different pair might be more optimal for people if they want form-fitting scrubs.

Material:  55% cotton, 45% polyester | Fit: Classic v-neck, roomy | Wash Recommendations: Machine wash, tumble dry

What the Experts Say

"I typically spend $15 to $18 per top and $20 to $22 per pant, which [is] pretty middle-of-the-road. I personally don't like the super inexpensive scrubs as they have a tendency to rip at the seams and seem to more readily absorb fluids, while the high-end scrubs tend to be fluid resistant and have antimicrobial properties, but don't withstand washing in hot water and drying on high heat." — Sarah Patterson, LVN, nurse from Southern California

Best With Pockets: Dickies Women's GenFlex Cargo Scrubs Pant

Dickies Women's GenFlex Cargo Scrubs Pant

Dickie's

Pros
  • Front, back, and cargo pockets

  • Stretchy material

  • Drawstring waist

Cons
  • Low-rise waist is not ideal for active jobs

  • Material attracts dust and lint

For some medical professionals, the pockets on scrubs are the most important feature to look for when selecting a pair. The Dickies GenFlex Cargo Scrubs mirror cargo pants by incorporating a variety of pockets throughout the design.

“Pockets, pockets, pockets,” Registered Nurse Danielle Pobre at VCUHealth System says. “That’s the one thing we need. As nurses, we end up putting things in our pockets such as alcohol pads, saline flushes, and more. We need to have easy access to these supplies right away as opposed to going back and forth to the supply room.” 

Dickies GenFlex Cargo Scrubs have nine pockets for healthcare workers to utilize as they go about their shifts. They have a low-rise, drawstring waist to stay comfortably situated on your hips throughout the workday, and a stretchy polyester-Spandex blend to keep the fit flexible.

Material: 52% cotton, 45% polyester, 3% spandex | Fit: Contemporary straight-leg | Wash Recommendations: Machine wash, tumble dry

Best for Plus Size: WonderWink Women's Plus-Size Wonderwork Pull-On Cargo Scrub Pant

WonderWink Women's Plus-Size Wonderwork Pull-On Cargo Scrub Pant

Womerwink Workshop

Pros
  • Extended sizes

  • Flattering, stretchy fit

  • High-rise waist with full coverage

Cons
  • Runs big

The standard scrub fabric is more boxy and less giving against the body. But scrub styles have since evolved to include more flexible and breathable materials that fit better for all body sizes. The WonderWink Plus Size Scrubs is made with a cotton-polyester blend that stretches in all the right places to flatter a person’s frame. Moreover, the scrubs come in a variety of sizes, including petite and tall, so that all types of bodies can find a size most flattering for them. If that still has not sold you on the scrubs, they also come with a variety of pockets scattered throughout the pants to make for easy access to supplies while on shift.

Material: 65% polyester, 35% cotton | Fit: Classic women’s fit with straight-leg pant | Wash Recommendations: Machine wash, tumble dry

What the Experts Say

"I look for tops with a little stretch as they are more comfortable [for] leaning, bending, and squatting without being loose enough that patients can see down my top as I'm providing care, and for pants I look for a drawstring because those stay up the best once I've loaded my pockets and started moving [around] for my shift." — Sarah Patterson, LVN, nurse from Southern California

Best During Pregnancy: Cherokee Maternity Mock Wrap Scrubs Shirt

Cherokee Maternity Mock Wrap Scrubs Shirt

Courtesy of Amazon

Pros
  • Breathable 

  • Drawstring top for adjustability through trimesters

  • Knit side panels

Cons
  • Tight-fitting in the chest

  • Fabric can be stiff or bulky

Making your way through the hospital for 12 hours can be challenging. Now imagine doing that with a baby on the way. To get you through a workday, you certainly need breathable scrubs that won’t weigh you down.

“I ended up with Cherokee maternity scrubs,” VCUHealth System Registered Nurse Taylor Russell said of her recent pregnancy. “The scrubs had a big stretchy band that went over my stomach and it was so comfortable. The top had a drawstring, so I could adjust it as I got bigger and it still had all the pockets that us nurses need to hold all the supplies we use regularly.” 

Cherokee Women’s Maternity Mock Wrap Scrubs Tops are perfect for any expecting mamas that need a little extra stretch to stay comfortable throughout their shifts. They're light and breathable, so you won't overheat, but provide enough coverage to protect your stomach throughout the workday.

Material: 65% polyester, 35% cotton | Fit: Empire waist | Wash Recommendations: Machine wash, tumble dry

Best for Men: Cherokee Men's Cargo Scrubs Pant

Cherokee Originals Cargo Scrubs Pant

Courtesy of Scrubs and Beyond

Pros
  • Drawstring waist

  • Zippered fly

  • Cargo pockets

Cons
  • Inseam runs long

  • Baggier fit

For many men, comfort is the biggest priority—and these Cherokee cargo scrub pants provide them with that cozy fit. Just make sure you dry them at low temperatures to avoid any shrinkage issues.

“When I’m shopping for scrubs, I look for comfort and flexibility,” Mechanicsville-based CVS Pharmacy Lead Technician Will Vanags says. “I also avoid over-the-top patterns and prefer solid colors that complement my go-to neutral sneakers.”

The Cherokee pants also work well for a long shift because they have a variety of pocket styles that can hold supplies, including a cargo pocket, pant back pocket, and slash pockets.

Material: 65% polyester, 35% cotton | Fit: Natural rise, straight-leg | Wash Recommendations: Machine wash, tumble dry low

What the Experts Say

"We add a custom thread logo to all our scrub tops, so for me, quality is far more important than price: it doesn't make sense to save a few dollars on the scrubs if I have to pay to customize more when the cheaper ones fall apart." — Kathryn Hively, dental practice manager from South Jersey

Best Yoga-Style: HeartSoul Break On Through Scrub Jogger Pant

HeartSoul Break On Through Low Rise Scrub Jogger Pant

Courtesy of Walmart

Pros
  • Extra-soft fabric

  • 14 colors

  • Four-way stretch

Cons
  • Runs large

Scrub styles have evolved to include more types that work better for people’s comfort levels and personal styles. The HeartSoul Break On Through Scrub Jogger Pant fits tighter against the leg, which makes them look closer to the yoga leggings that we’ve all come to love. The stretch fabric is flexible and durable, making it the most optimal pair to wear over and over again to work.

These scrubs are also designed with a drawstring and a contemporary, low-rise silhouette that will fit your body just right. The best part? They also come in a variety of sizes—petite, regular, and tall—and colors.

Material: 95% polyester, 5% spandex | Fit: Low-rise jogger | Wash Recommendations: Machine wash cold, tumble dry low

Most Comfortable: Moxie Scrubs Justine Jogger Pant

Moxie Scrubs Justine Jogger Pant

Moxie

Pros
  • Six pockets

  • Sizes up to 5X

  • Rib-knit waistband

Cons
  • Run big

Comfort is key when working a 12-hour shift as a medical professional. The Moxie Scrubs boast a comfortable fit all day long, no matter what your schedule looks like. The scrubs are so comfortable that Samantha Roecker, a board-certified registered nurse in Philadelphia, ran the Boston Marathon while wearing Moxie Scrubs. “There were no issues and the comfort was on point,” she says. “They were durable enough to withstand the marathon, so a 12-hour shift should be a piece of cake.” 

The scrubs come in polyester spandex, which gives the feel of athletic clothes when wearing. “I am a fan of the more breathable, moveable material, which is what I have always been looking for in scrubs,” Roecker says. Additionally, the scrubs come with multiple pockets, making them not just comfortable but also functional.

Material: 91% polyester, 9% spandex | Fit: High-waisted joggers | Wash Recommendations: Wash cold inside-out, tumble dry low

What the Experts Say

"Some [of our employees] prefer fitted tops, some prefer looser fit, some need longer pants, some need a petite cut. The blend of the material—the amount of stretch—seems to be a big consideration for them." — Kathryn Hively, dental practice manager from South Jersey


Most Stylish: FIGS High Waisted Zamora Jogger Scrub Pants 2.0

FIGS High Waisted Zamora Jogger Scrub Pants 2.0

FIGS

Pros
  • Pants feature deep pockets

  • Stylish

  • Drawstring elastic wasitband

Cons
  • Expensive

Joggers are one of the latest styles that have made their rounds not just in everyday clothes, but in scrubs as well. Some employers have become more lenient and allowed nurses and doctors to incorporate this style into their work looks. FIGS is one brand that has made its mark in the scrub industry for creating comfortable and durable clothes for medical professionals. “I’ve been wearing FIGS for three years and they are as vibrant as the first day I got them,” says Nacole Riccaboni, a board-certified registered nurse in Florida. “They retain their color after multiple washes, the fabric doesn’t stiffen or degrade after multiple washes, and unlike most scrubs, the inner thighs sections don’t fall apart.” 

FIGS are more of an investment given the price point, however, the durability of these scrubs can make them worth it depending on one’s own work needs.

Material: 72% polyester, 21% rayon, 7% spandex | Fit: High-waisted joggers | Wash Recommendations: Wash cold inside-out, tumble dry low

Final Verdict

If you’re looking for a comfortable pair of scrubs that won’t break the bank, then we recommend the Dagacci Medical Uniform Scrubs. These come in a variety of sizes and colors, and they will also feel comfortable against the skin during a long shift. If you are looking to make more of an investment in your work wardrobe, then we recommend the FIGS High Waisted Zamora Jogger.

How We Selected the Best Scrubs

When selecting scrubs for medical professionals, we spoke with doctors and nurses for their recommendations. We then spent hours combing the web for the best and most effective products. After taking all of our options into consideration, we determined which to feature based on key criteria recommended by the experts: durability, functionality, fit, and style. 

Once we narrowed down our options, we compared the scrubs' benefits to their price tag. While some choices on our list may be more expensive, we wanted to give a wide range of options that would fit all needs and budgets. Based on all of these factors, we compiled this list of the best scrubs for medical professionals.

What to Look for in Scrubs

Durability

Dealing with bodily fluids is a normal part of a healthcare provider’s job, so you need scrubs that will stand up to the rigors of caring for patients as well as the rigors of your washing machine. “If I’m going to spend $75 for a scrub set, it needs to last,” Riccaboni says. “I don’t have the income to keep buying scrubs over and over.”

A pair of scrubs' ability to withstand wash cycles is the biggest indicator of if the pair will last. “My scrubs experience many washes and I think the fabric itself is the most important in terms of longevity of the scrubs,” says Michael Cellini, DO, an interventional radiology fellow in New York City. “Performance scrubs may cost a little more on average, but they tend to last longer than conventional scrubs.”

In other words, know what the care instructions are for the type of fabric used to make your scrubs; if it’s notorious for fading or wearing down quickly, your items may not be able to keep up with what you need. “I’m a professional, so my scrubs can’t be full of old stains or just present as dingy,” Riccaboni says. “When my patients see me, I must establish trust quickly, and I respect that process. I show them I care about my appearance and come to work professionally and prepared.”

Functionality

Ask pretty much any healthcare provider what one feature they want to see most on their scrubs and we guarantee the answer will resoundingly be “pockets!” No one likes to spend their entire day on their feet without any place to store their most-used items, whether it’s a cell phone, pager, ID badge, stethoscope, or even a good old fashioned pen and pad. 

And not just any pockets will do, says Shiefer; there should be several of them, appropriately placed and sized so items fit well inside without falling out. Dr. Cellini agrees: “A number of pockets is a plus—I feel like I’m always carrying a lot of items on the job and the more pockets, the better!”

For Roecker, the placement of the pockets is the most important part of their function. “My thing about pockets is I want them to be in a functional place,” she says. “I am looking for pockets that I can easily grab into and find what I need.” Pockets that are “in the front” of the pants as well as “a side pocket on the leg” are two priorities for Roecker when shopping for scrubs.

Fit and Style

When you picture scrubs, you probably envision a boxy, loose-fitting, top and bottom set with a v-neck and drawstring waist. And while that is the classic scrubs look, many companies have been branching out to offer scrubs in different styles. “I love that the joggers are acceptable now,” Roecker says. “As a runner, that is really cool to me.”

Styles like slim fit, mandarin collar, button-up, cargo, jogger, crew neck, and raglan sleeve are now available, because scrubs manufacturers know that healthcare professionals not only come in a variety of shapes, heights, and sizes, they also have widely different personal styles. “I personally have a curvier shape and don’t want my scrubs being too tight,” Riccaboni says, who prefers straight-legged pants. “My goal when buying scrubs is form and function. It doesn’t matter how cute a scrub set is if it itches, rides up, or shrinks on the wash.”

For some professionals, finding a pair of scrubs that fits their personal aesthetic is one of their top concerns; Schiefer says that while she always prioritizes fabric over fit, she does ultimately want to look good in her scrubs and prefers pairs that fit well and are stylish. 

Frequently Asked Questions

  • How often should scrubs be cleaned?

    Ideally, after every shift—though that may not be necessary if you’re not coming into contact with patients. 

    Sarah Patterson, LVN, a nurse from Southern California, keeps her scrubs in a designated plastic hamper between wears, unless she knows she’s been in contact with a patient’s body fluids or in an isolation room. In those cases, she says, they go straight into the washing machine.

  • How many pairs of scrubs do you need?

    It depends on how many shifts you work per week, as well as your ability to launder your scrubs appropriately (and any other factors, like how often your scrubs may become contaminated between patients). 

    “I like to have enough for the work week plus two extra sets,” says Portia Wofford, LPN, Georgia-based former nurse manager in a skilled nursing facility. “When I worked three shifts per week, that meant five [sets in total]. 

    However, Wofford notes that each nurse has to decide what works best for them and whether they need backup sets of scrubs (and if so, how many).

  • Do colleges and hospitals provide scrubs for nurses?

    This can vary widely between individual colleges and hospitals.
    “Some programs include scrubs as part of your tuition and fees,” says Wofford. “Others simply require nursing students to wear a specific color and you purchase your scrubs, independently.”
    The college that Rebecca Abraham, RN, founder of Acute on Chronic LLC, attended didn’t provide scrubs, but her last ICU job at a hospital did; it was a huge convenience, she says, as it improved her work/life balance to be given a pair of clean surgical scrubs at work to change into every shift. 
    Hospitals that don’t provide scrubs completely free to employees may also make it easier for nurses to purchase them or “earn” free pairs, says Wofford: “You may have to work for 90 days before you get a free set of scrubs, or you get a free set on your work anniversary.” 
    Some hospitals also sell scrubs in the gift shop, invite scrub companies to come on site to sell their items, and offer to deduct the cost of scrubs from their employees’ paychecks. 

  • Do different color scrubs have different meanings?

    Usually, yes, there is some kind of distinction between the scrubs that nurses wear and the ones other healthcare providers wear when you’re on-site at a hospital or larger medical facility.

    “This helps the patient identify who is who on their care team,” explains Abraham, “[and] usually nurses are assigned some variation of blue.”

    Wofford breaks down the various ways scrub colors can be used to distinguish between healthcare providers:

    • Nurses may wear different color scrubs than other on-site employees 
    • Nurses on certain units wear specific colors
    • Nurse managers or supervisors wear different colors than bedside nurses
      However, she also says it doesn’t work this way all the time—in some facilities, the color of your scrubs doesn’t matter at all.
  • What’s the best way to clean scrubs?

    Generally, scrubs should be washed in hot water and then dried on high heat, though you'll want to read the care instructions beforehand to avoid damaging your pair.

    “They have to be removed from the dryer right away and folded or they wrinkle like crazy, and no one has time to iron scrubs,” says Kathryn Hively, a dental practice manager from South Jersey who orders scrubs for the staff in the office.

    As far as washing protocols, it depends on how dirty your scrubs are. Patterson says if she knows her scrubs are contaminated with a patient’s germs, she washes them on a sanitize setting using Tide with bleach and Lysol laundry sanitizer.

Why Trust Verywell Health

As a seasoned health writer, Isis Briones knows the importance of finding products that work best for you and your conditions. You can count on her to always provide a variety of recommendations from licensed medical professionals because she has tested and reviewed tons of products over the years to know everyone is different.

Additional reporting to this story by Danielle Zoellner

As a seasoned health writer, Danielle Zoellner knows the importance of finding just the right product to fit your medical needs. Throughout her career, Danielle has interviewed a variety of experts in the medical and health fields while reviewing dozens of products. Her experience and knowledge in the field work together to help readers like yourself find the best products for your daily life.

By Isis Briones
Isis has written for Verywell Health since August 2020. Her work has appeared in Forbes, Travel + Leisure, Teen Vogue, and more.  Isis has a dual degree in Communications and Spanish from Wake Forest University.