Corlanor (Ivabradine) - Oral

What Is Corlanor?

Corlanor (ivabradine) is a prescription medication used to treat heart failure in adults and children aged 6 months and older.

It belongs to a class of medications known as hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channel inhibitors.

In heart failure, the heart is unable to pump enough blood to the rest of the body. As a result, your heart might need to work harder to meet the body’s needs. Corlanor works by inhibiting specific channels within the sinoatrial (SA) node. The SA node, which is located in the upper right chamber of the heart, works as the heart’s natural pacemaker to help control its rhythm. Corlanor affects the SA node to help slow the heart rate.

Drug Facts

Generic Name: Ivabradine

Brand Name(s): Corlanor

Administration Route(s): Oral

Drug Availability: Prescription

Therapeutic Classification: Cardiovascular agent

Available Generically: No

Controlled Substance: N/A

Active Ingredient: Ivabradine

Dosage Form(s): Tablet, solution

What Is Corlanor Used For?

The Food and Drug Administration approved Corlanor to treat and prevent worsening disease in adults with chronic (long-lasting) heart failure and certain children aged 6 months and older with stable heart failure.

Heart failure is a condition in which the heart is unable to pump enough blood to meet the body’s needs.

Specifically, Corlanor helps to:

  • Reduce the risk of hospitalization in adults with chronic heart failure
  • Treat stable heart failure due to a heart muscle disease called dilated cardiomyopathy in children aged 6 months and older
Corlanor (Ivabradine) Drug Information

Verywell / Zoe Hansen

How to Take Corlanor

Corlanor is available as an oral tablet and oral solution. It is meant to be taken by mouth. Take Corlanor two times each day with food, but avoid drinking grapefruit or grapefruit juice with it.

The oral solution comes in a vial container with 5 milliliters (mL) of the medicine. The dose may be higher or lower than one of these containers, so you may only need to use some of the vial or more than the vial. When taking the solution, make sure to use the oral syringe provided to you by your pharmacist to measure the dose.

Storage

Store Corlanor at a controlled room temperature, which is about 68 F to 77 F, away from light. Keep it in its original unopened foil pouch until you are ready to take it. 

Always carry your medication with you. If you are flying, make sure to keep the original prescription-labeled bottle or box in your carry-on bag. Don’t leave this medication in your car, especially if the temperature is going to be very cold or hot.

How Long Does Corlanor Take to Work?

Ivabradine typically reaches peak concentration in the body in about one hour, but food may delay its absorption. It is recommended to take it with food.

What Are the Side Effects of Corlanor?

This is not a complete list of side effects, and others may occur. A medical professional can advise you on side effects. If you experience other effects, contact your pharmacist or a medical professional. You may report side effects to the FDA at www.fda.gov/medwatch or 1-800-FDA-1088.

Like most medications, Corlanor can cause mild or serious side effects. Tell your healthcare provider about any side effects you experience while taking this medication.

Common Side Effects

The most common side effects with Corlanor include:

  • Increased blood pressure
  • Temporary visual brightness: Usually happens within the first two months of treatment and may go away during or after treatment

Talk to your healthcare provider if these side effects don’t go away or become more severe.

Severe Side Effects

Call your healthcare provider right away if you have serious side effects. Call 911 if your symptoms feel life-threatening or if you think you’re having a medical emergency.

Serious side effects and their symptoms can include the following:

  • Severe allergic reactions, symptoms may include
  • Trouble breathing
  • Hives
  • Swelling of the tongue, lips, mouth, or throat
  • Bradycardia (slow heart rate)
  • Atrial fibrillation (irregular or rapid heart rate)

Report Side Effects

Corlanor may cause other side effects. Call your healthcare provider if you have any unusual problems while taking this medication.

If you experience a serious side effect, you or your provider may send a report to the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) MedWatch Adverse Event Reporting Program or by phone (800-332-1088).

Dosage: How Much Corlanor Should I Take?

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The dose of this medicine will be different for different patients. Follow your doctor's orders or the directions on the label. The following information includes only the average doses of this medicine. If your dose is different, do not change it unless your doctor tells you to do so.

The amount of medicine that you take depends on the strength of the medicine. Also, the number of doses you take each day, the time allowed between doses, and the length of time you take the medicine depend on the medical problem for which you are using the medicine.

  • For heart failure:
    • For oral dosage form (solution):
      • Adults—At first, 5 milligrams (mg) 2 times a day. Your doctor may adjust your dose as needed and tolerated. However, the dose is usually not more than 7.5 mg 2 times a day.
      • Children 6 months of age and older weighing less than 40 kilograms (kg)—Dose is based on body weight and must be determined by your doctor. At first, 0.05 milligram per kilogram (mg/kg) of body weight. Your doctor may adjust your dose as needed and tolerated. However, the dose is usually not more than 7.5 mg 2 times a day.
      • Children younger than 6 months of age—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.
    • For oral dosage form (tablets):
      • Adults—At first, 5 milligrams (mg) 2 times a day. Your doctor may adjust your dose as needed and tolerated. However, the dose is usually not more than 7.5 mg 2 times a day.
      • Children weighing 40 kilograms (kg) or more—At first, 2.5 milligrams (mg) 2 times a day. Your doctor may adjust your dose as needed and tolerated. However, the dose is usually not more than 7.5 mg 2 times a day.
      • Children weighing less than 40 kg—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.

Missed Dose

If a dose of Corlanor is missed or spit out, skip that dose and take the next dose at the regularly scheduled time. Do not take extra to make up for the missed dose. Doing so can increase your risk for side effects.

Overdose: What Happens If I Take Too Much Corlanor?

Taking too much Corlanor can lead to severe or prolonged bradycardia (slow heart rate). If you overdose on Corlanor, you may need temporary cardiac pacing to regulate the heart rate or supportive treatment.

What Happens If I Overdose on Corlanor?

If you think you or someone else may have overdosed on Corlanor, call a healthcare provider or the Poison Control Center (800-222-1222).

If someone collapses or isn't breathing after taking Corlanor, call 911 immediately.

Precautions

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It is very important that your doctor check your progress at regular visits. This will allow your doctor to see if the medicine is working properly and to check for unwanted effects.

Using this medicine while you are pregnant can harm your unborn baby. Use an effective form of birth control to keep from getting pregnant. If you think you have become pregnant while using this medicine, tell your doctor right away.

Do not use this medicine if you are also using clarithromycin (Biaxin®), itraconazole (Sporanox®), ketoconazole (Nizoral®), nefazodone (Serzone®), nelfinavir (Viracept®), or telithromycin (Ketek®). Using these medicines together may cause serious unwanted effects.

This medicine may increase your risk for heart rhythm problems, including atrial fibrillation and bradycardia. Check with your doctor right away if you have fast, slow, or irregular heartbeat, dizziness, fainting, or trouble breathing while using this medicine.

This medicine may cause temporary visual brightness, usually caused by sudden changes in light (luminous phenomena or phosphenes). This may happen within the first 2 months of treatment with this medicine. Use caution when driving or using machines where sudden changes in light can happen, especially when driving at night.

Do not take other medicines unless thy have been discussed with your doctor. This includes prescription or nonprescription (over-the-counter [OTC]) medicines and herbal (eg, St. John's wort) or vitamin supplements.

What Are Reasons I Shouldn’t Take Corlanor?

There are a few reasons why your healthcare provider may not choose Corlanor as part of your treatment plan.

Allergy

A person should not take Corlanor if they are allergic to the ingredients.

Pregnancy

Corlanor may cause harm to the unborn child. It is best to talk to your healthcare provider if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant, so they can decide the best option for you.

Breastfeeding

It isn’t known if Corlanor passes into human milk, but it is possible it can cause serious harm to a child that is breastfed. Talk with your provider if you are breastfeeding to discuss the best plan for you.

Older Adults

A person aged 65 years or older often processes drugs more slowly. A lower dose or different schedule may be required.

Other Health Conditions

In certain individuals, the body may handle Corlanor differently. Inform your healthcare provider if you have:

What Other Medications Interact With Corlanor?

There are a few medications that can interact with Corlanor.

Cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) Inhibitors

When taken with a type of medication known as CYP3A4 inhibitors, there is an increased risk of bradycardia. 

A few examples of these medications include:

  • Itraconazole
  • Clarithromycin
  • Nelfinavir
  • Diltiazem
  • Verapamil
  • Grapefruit juice
  • St. John’s wort
  • Rifampin
  • Phenytoin
  • Barbiturates

Negative Chronotropes

These medications also can slow your heart rate. Do not take types of medications, which include:

This list does not include all drugs that can interact with Corlanor. Before using Corlanor, be sure to tell your healthcare provider about all of the prescription medications, over-the-counter medications, vitamins, supplements, and herbs you are taking. This will help you avoid potential interactions. If you have any questions about drug interactions, speak with your doctor or pharmacist.

What Medications Are Similar?

There are a few other classes of medications used to treat heart failure, including:

  • Zestril (lisinopril)
  • Toprol XL (metoprolol succinate)
  • Microzide (hydrochlorothiazide)

Zestril

Lisinopril is an angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor used to treat high blood pressure and heart failure. It is also prescribed after heart attacks. Lisinopril is available as an oral tablet. The most common side effects include headache, dizziness, low blood pressure, or cough.

Toprol XL

Metoprolol succinate is a beta blocker that treats high blood pressure, heart failure, and angina pectoris. Metoprolol succinate is available as an extended-release oral tablet. Common side effects include dizziness or low heart rate.

Microzide

Hydrochlorothiazide is a diuretic, also called a water pill, that is used to treat high blood pressure and edema, or swelling, associated with congestive heart failure, cirrhosis, or kidney problems. The most common side effects include dizziness, headache, or weakness.

This is a list of examples of medications used to treat heart failure. It is not a list of drugs recommended to take with Corlanor. Ask your pharmacist or healthcare provider if you have any questions.

Frequently Asked Questions

  • What is Corlanor used for?

    Corlanor treats heart failure by inhibiting specific channels within the sinoatrial (SA) node, the body’s natural pacemaker. This leads to slow firing in the SA node and a slower heart rate.

  • What are the side effects of Corlanor?

    The most common side effects are increased blood pressure or visual brightness. Corlanor also has the potential for serious side effects such as an allergic reaction, bradycardia, or atrial fibrillation.

  • How do I safely stop taking Corlanor?

    Do not stop taking Corlanor without first speaking with a healthcare provider. They will be able to help come up with a plan for the safest way to stop taking the medication.

How Can I Stay Healthy While Taking Corlanor?

Corlanor is a safe and effective medication when used correctly. This drug is often used to treat heart failure in adults and children.

While Corlanor does have the potential for serious side effects such as allergic reactions or bradycardia, the most common side effects may be milder. Those tend to include visual brightness or increased blood pressure.

If you have heart failure, there are steps you can take to improve your overall health and well-being, such as exercise and diet changes. Reducing your intake of salt, for example, can help manage heart problems and prevent fluid retention. Regular, moderate exercise such as walking or using an exercise bike can be beneficial for your overall heart health.

It is important to inform your healthcare provider of all of your other health conditions as well as any prescription medications, over-the-counter medications, vitamins, supplements, and herbs you are taking. This way your provider is able to make the best decision about what medication and what dose are safe and work best for you.

Medical Disclaimer

Verywell Health's drug information is meant for education purposes only and not intended as a replacement for medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment from a healthcare professional. Consult your doctor before taking any new medication(s). IBM Watson Micromedex provides some of the drug content, as indicated on the page.

7 Sources
Verywell Health uses only high-quality sources, including peer-reviewed studies, to support the facts within our articles. Read our editorial process to learn more about how we fact-check and keep our content accurate, reliable, and trustworthy.
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