Luzu (Luliconazole) - Topical

What Is Luzu?

Luzu (luliconazole) is a topical prescription medication used to treat various fungal infections on the skin, such as jock itch, ringworm, and athlete's foot in adults and children 2 and older.

Luzu is available via prescription as a topical cream (medication you apply to your skin) and belongs to a class of medications called azole antifungals.

For context, azole antifungals are medications used to inhibit the growth of a wide range of fungi, including fungal nail infections and vaginal candidiasis (yeast infections).

Luzu works by blocking certain enzymes to inhibit the creation of fungi cell membranes, making them easier to kill.

Currently, no therapeutically equivalent version of Luzu, containing the active ingredient luliconazole, is available in the United States (U.S.).

However, Luzu, a brand-name medication, is available as a white, 1% cream in a 60-gram tube.

Drug Facts

Generic Name: Luliconazole

Brand Name: Luzu

Drug Availability: Prescription

Administration Route: Topical

Therapeutic Classification: Antifungal

Available Generically: No

Controlled Substance: N/A

Active Ingredient: Luliconazole

Dosage Form: Cream

What Is Luzu Used For?

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved Luzu for the topical treatment of interdigital tinea pedis (athlete’s foot), tinea cruris (jock itch), and tinea corporis (ringworm). This drug has been approved for use in adults and children 2 and older.

For further context, tinea pedis, or athlete's foot, is a fungal infection of the feet, most commonly appearing between a person's toes. Athlete's foot is the most common tinea infection (a fungal infection of the skin).

In comparison, tinea cruris, or jock itch, is defined as a form of ringworm (a fungal infection of the outer layers of skin, hair, or nails) that appears on the groin causing a painful, itchy rash. Jock itch is most common in males.

Finally, tinea corporis (ringworm), refers to a fungus that creates circular, patchy scales. This type of fungus is spread by skin-to-skin contact with an infected animal or person.

How to Use Luzu

Use this medicine exactly as directed by your healthcare provider.

Follow all the directions on your medicine label. Do not use more or less of this medicine or use it for longer than prescribed:

  • If you have athlete’s foot between your toes, apply a thin layer of the affected skin areas to about 1 inch beyond the rash on all sides once a day for two weeks.
  • If you have jock itch or ringworm, apply to the affected skin areas and about 1 inch beyond the rash on all sides once a day for one week.
  • Wash your hands after you apply Luzu.

Ask a healthcare provider if you do not understand how to take your medications.

Storage

Store Luzu at room temperature (between 68 F and 77 F), away from heat, direct light, and moisture. Do not store it in the bathroom. Keep this medication in its original labeled container and out of reach of children and pets. Keep the bottle tightly closed when not in use.

How Long Does Luzu Take to Work?

Expect an improvement in symptoms after using Luzu for a few days.

Secondly, use this cream for the recommended duration (two weeks for athlete's foot, one week for jock itch/ringworm), even if your symptoms have faded.

What Are the Side Effects of Luzu?

This is not a complete list of side effects, and others may occur. A healthcare provider can advise you on side effects. If you experience other effects, contact your pharmacist or a healthcare provider. You may report side effects to the FDA at fda.gov/medwatch or 1-800-FDA-1088.

Common Side Effects

The most common side effect associated with the use of Luzu include:

  • Application site reaction
  • General skin irritation

Severe Side Effects

Call your healthcare provider immediately if you have serious side effects. Call 911 if your symptoms feel life-threatening or if you think you have a medical emergency.

Serious side effects and their symptoms can include the following:

  • Contact dermatitis (irritated skin as a result of coming into contact with a foreign substance)
  • Cellulitis (a noncontagious bacterial infection of the skin)

Report Side Effects

Luzu may cause other side effects. Call your healthcare provider if you have any unusual problems while taking this medication. If you experience a serious side effect, you or your healthcare provider may send a report to the FDA's MedWatch Adverse Event Reporting Program or by phone (800-332-1088).

Dosage: How Much Luzu Should I Take?

Drug Content Provided and Reviewed by IBM Micromedex®

The dose of this medicine will be different for different patients. Follow your doctor's orders or the directions on the label. The following information includes only the average doses of this medicine. If your dose is different, do not change it unless your doctor tells you to do so.

The amount of medicine that you take depends on the strength of the medicine. Also, the number of doses you take each day, the time allowed between doses, and the length of time you take the medicine depend on the medical problem for which you are using the medicine.

  • For topical dosage form (cream):
    • For interdigital tinea pedis:
      • Adults and children 12 to 17 years of age—Apply to the affected area(s) and about 1 inch of the immediate surrounding area(s) once a day for 2 weeks.
      • Children younger than 12 years of age—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.
    • For tinea corporis:
      • Adults and children 2 to 17 years of age—Apply to the affected area(s) and about 1 inch of the immediate surrounding area(s) once a day for 1 week.
      • Children younger than 2 years of age—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.
    • For tinea cruris:
      • Adults and children 12 to 17 years of age—Apply to the affected area(s) and about 1 inch of the immediate surrounding area(s) once a day for 1 week.
      • Children younger than 12 years of age—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.

Modifications

Potential users should note the following before starting treatment with Luzu:

Pregnancy: Luzu may be used during pregnancy. There is no risk expected for an unborn baby based on low systemic absorption. Tell your healthcare provider if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while using this medicine.

Lactation: Avoid use on the nipple while breastfeeding; otherwise, it may be used on other areas—as there is no risk expected for an unborn baby based on minimal passage into breast milk. There is no data on its effects on milk production. Talk to your healthcare provider if you are nursing a baby.

Pediatric Use: Luliconazole inhalation is not approved for anyone younger than 2 years old. Specifically, it treats athlete's foot or jock itch in those at least 12 years old or ringworm in those at least 2 years old.

Missed Dose

If you miss a dose of this medication, apply it as soon as you remember. You can skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next dose.

Resume the medication at your next scheduled time. Do not take extra to make up for the missed dose. Call your healthcare provider if you are unsure of what to do.

Overdose: What Happens If I Take Too Much Luzu?

There exists the potential for negative side effects if an individual takes an excessive amount of Luzu.

Specifically, doubling up on doses, or using more than initially prescribed in a singular dose, can result in application site reactions, such as redness or swelling at the application site.

What Happens If I Overdose on Luzu?

If you think you or someone else may have overdosed on Luzu, call a healthcare provider or the Poison Control Center (800-222-1222). If someone collapses or isn't breathing after taking Luzu, call 911 immediately.

Drug Content Provided and Reviewed by IBM Micromedex®

It is very important that your doctor check your progress at regular visits to make sure this medicine is working properly and to check for unwanted effects.

If your skin problem does not improve within 2 weeks or more, or if it becomes worse, check with your doctor.

Do not use this medicine for a skin problem that has not been checked by your doctor.

Check with your doctor right away if you have a skin rash, burning, stinging, swelling, redness, or irritation on the skin.

What Are the Reasons I Shouldn’t Take Luzu?

Luzu is not appropriate for everyone.

You should not take this medication if you are allergic to miglitol or any of the inactive ingredients in it.

What Other Medications Interact With Luzu?

Watch out for these medications when taking Luzu, as they can affect how it works in the body:

Janus kinase inhibitors, such as Inrebic (fedratinib): Avoid combination with Luzu. Luzu blocks the clearance of fedratinib from the body. This may lead to increased fedratinib levels which may cause serious infections or other adverse effects.

Methadone: The combination may increase methadone levels, slow down your central nervous system and breathing, decrease your movement, or affect your heart function. Your healthcare provider may choose an alternative medication or lower the dose of your methadone if these must be combined.

Celexa (citalopram): The combination may increase citalopram levels in the body which may cause serious risks to your heart. Your healthcare provider may adjust your citalopram dose if these must be taken together.

Valium (diazepam): The combination may increase diazepam levels, slow down your central nervous system and breathing, decrease your movement, or affect your heart function. Your healthcare provider may monitor your breathing if you must take these together.

Camzyos (mavacamten): The combination may increase mavacamten levels, which then increases the risk of heart failure. If you have to take both medications, your healthcare provider may adjust the dose of your mavacamten.

Phenytoin or fosphenytoin: The combination may increase phenytoin levels and thereby increasing the risk of toxicity.

Carisoprodol: The combination may increase carisoprodol levels, slow down your central nervous system and breathing and decrease your movement.

Clopidogrel: The combination may decrease the efficacy of clopidogrel.

Flibanserin: The combination may increase flibanserin levels, increasing the risk of hypotension (low blood pressure) and fainting.

Since Luzu is used on the skin, it is not likely to interact with other drugs you use. Tell your healthcare providers about all medicines you use, including prescription and over-the-counter (OTC) medicines, vitamins, and herbal products.

What Medications Are Similar?

Medications similar to Luzu include:

Tinactin (Tolnaftate topical cream):

Tolnaftate is an antifungal cream for treating tinea pedis (athlete's foot) and tinea corporis (ringworm) in people 2 and older.

It is more limited than Luzu as it does not treat tinea cruris (jock itch). It is active against various fungi. It is available OTC, unlike Luzu, which requires a prescription.

Lotrisone (betamethasone/clotrimazole):

Lotrisone is a combination medicine that contains a steroid and an antifungal. It treats tinea pedis (athlete's foot), tinea cruris (jock itch), and tinea corporis (ringworm). It is more limited than Luzu as it can only be used by those 17 and older.

Clotrimazole works in the same way as Luzu, while betamethasone works to reduce inflammation. Therefore, it may be better than Luzu for fungal skin infections with swelling or itching. Lotrisone is also less safe during pregnancy and while nursing than Luzu.

Loprox (Ciclopirox):

Ciclopirox prevents fungus from growing on the skin. It is more versatile than Luzu; it is available as a cream, gel, lotion, and nail lacquer. It treats tinea pedis (athlete's foot), tinea cruris (jock itch), tinea corporis (ringworm), and yeast infections.

However, it is more limited than Luzu as it can only be used by those 10 and older. It also has antibacterial and anti-inflammatory effects. 

Frequently Asked Questions

  • What is Luzu used for?

    Luzu is used on the skin to treat fungal infections like athlete’s foot between the toes, jock itch, and ringworm.

  • How do I use Luzu?

    Use this cream exactly as your healthcare provider tells you to use it.

    Apply a thin layer to the affected skin about 1 inch beyond the rash. Wash your hands after application.

  • How does Luzu work?

    Luliconazole is an antifungal belonging to the azole class. It inhibits an enzyme needed for making ergosterol, a major component of the fungus cell membranes. This, in turn, makes the fungi easier to infiltrate and kill. 

How Can I Stay Healthy While Taking Luzu?

Fungal skin infections can cause itching and become annoying. Most are easy to identify and treat; they are rarely severe. Luzu is a treatment option when dealing with fungal skin infections.

Use Luzu as directed by your healthcare provider. Do not change your dose or medication schedule without consulting with your healthcare provider. Do not use this medicine to treat any condition your healthcare provider has not checked.

Do not give this cream to other people, even if they have the same symptoms. It may harm them. Tell your healthcare provider if your rash is not clearing up.

Do not swallow this medicine. This medicine is only to be applied to the skin. Avoid getting this medicine in your eyes or vagina. If you have trouble remembering to take this medication, consider setting alarms on your phone or calendar.

Medical Disclaimer

Verywell Health's drug information is meant for educational purposes only and is not intended to replace medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment from a healthcare provider. Consult your healthcare provider before taking any new medication(s). IBM Watson Micromedex provides some of the drug content, as indicated on the page.

9 Sources
Verywell Health uses only high-quality sources, including peer-reviewed studies, to support the facts within our articles. Read our editorial process to learn more about how we fact-check and keep our content accurate, reliable, and trustworthy.
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  2. Chen SC, Sorrell TC. Antifungal agentsMed J Aust. 2007;187(7):404-409. doi:10.5694/j.1326-5377.2007.tb01313.x

  3. Penn Medicine. Athlete's foot.

  4. Nemours Teen Health. Jock itch.

  5. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Ringworm.

  6. Prescribers' Digital Reference. Luliconazole - drug summary.

  7. Bayer pharmaceuticals. Tinactin drug facts.

  8. Food and Drug Administration. Lotrisone prescribing information.

  9. Food and Drug Administration. Loprox prescribing information.