Lyme Disease

Lyme disease is an infection caused by a bacterium called Borrelia burgdorferi, which is spread to humans via the bite of infected black-legged ticks, commonly known as deer ticks. 

More than 95% of Lyme disease cases come from the Northeastern quarter of the United States, from Maine down to Virginia, and between the east coast and the western border of Minnesota.

Symptoms usually begin 3 to 30 days after you're bitten and often resemble the flu. It’s sometimes diagnosed with antibody tests, but if you have a confirmed tick bite, your doctor may diagnose it based on symptoms alone. If left untreated, Lyme disease can lead to other symptoms weeks later, including severe fatigue and multiple rashes. However, this is less common and unlikely without the presence of other Lyme disease symptoms.

Treatment is generally antibiotics, but some people need more intensive treatment. Avoiding tick bites is the best way to prevent Lyme disease.

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