The 7 Best Pulse Oximeters of 2022 for At-Home Use

Insignia's Pulse Oximeter delivers accurate oxygen results in seconds

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Best Pulse Oximeters

Verywell Health / Leticia Almeida

While pulse oximeters may have been traditionally used on those who have chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, or other lung conditions, they’re helpful to have in the medicine cabinet. Not just limited to use in hospitals, pulse oximeters are a non-invasive household staple that’s placed on your fingertip to pinpoint the level of oxygen in your blood. They’re especially useful for pilots or endurance athletes who work or train at high altitudes, where there’s increased risk for lack of oxygen. And if you develop COVID-19 symptoms, a pulse oximeter is also handy for tracking oxygen levels.

Reviewed & Approved

Insignia’s Pulse Oximeter is easy to use and delivers accurate oxygen results in seconds. If you're looking for a budget-friendly and hypoallergenic option, we'd recommend Zacurate's Pro Series 500DL.

“It’s normal for your oxygen to fluctuate between 95 and 100 percent if you are otherwise healthy,” says Kathleen Dass, MD, an allergist and immunologist privately practicing in Michigan. “There aren’t any known risks to using a pulse oximeter unless [you don’t know] how to interpret the numbers you have.”

When buying a pulse oximeter, look for FDA classification, accuracy, type, and your intended usage. After eight hours of testing and analyzing our feedback, we narrowed down our list to seven devices, based on setup, fit, ease of use, data display, and overall value.

Here are the top pulse oximeters on the market today, according to our tests.

Editor's Note:

Note that none of these devices have received FDA clearance for use as a medical device, and are intended for sports and aviation use only in healthy people in order to monitor pulse and oxygen saturation levels. Furthermore, the devices were not tested in tandem with medical-grade (prescription) oximeters or actual measurement of blood oxygenation levels, so they could not be analyzed to confirm their accuracy.

Best Overall: Insignia Pulse Oximeter with Digital Display

4.9
Insignia Pulse Oximeter with Digital Display
Our Ratings
  • Setup
    5/5
  • Fit
    5/5
  • Ease of Use
    3.5/5
  • Data Display
    5/5
  • Overall Value
    4/5
Pros
  • Accommodates a variety of finger sizes

  • Bright and readable display

  • Shows results in four different ways

Cons
  • Device is a little too sensitive

What do buyers say? 150+ BestBuy reviewers rated this product 4 stars or above.

Insignia’s Pulse Oximeter earned its spot as our top choice with attribute ratings of five out of five stars for all but one. Our tester found the monitor finicky, as your finger needs to be still and lined up exactly right. However, after you get the hang of it, it’s a good choice if you don’t mind some device sensitivity in exchange for accuracy. Our tester doesn’t recommend this choice for those with Parkinson’s or who may have trouble keeping their fingers still.

The monitor works double duty as it also tracks your heart rate apart from just oxygen levels, making it appealing for training in addition to health analysis. We found the data display bright and readable, with many customizable settings that offer a lot of bang for your buck. Accessible for those who are visually impaired, it offers 10 brightness settings and four display modes so you can make adjustments as your surroundings change. Batteries are also included, with an indicator of when they’re running low, as well as a lanyard, so you can keep the device close by at all times. 

While ease of use received the lowest score, of 3.5, of all products on our list, our tester ultimately thought the pros outweighed the cons and found its accuracy unparalleled—making it our top option.

Price at time of publication: $40

Weight: .11 pounds | Dimensions: 1.42 x 2.28 x 1.33 inches | Power Source: Battery-operated (included) | Smartphone-Compatible: No

Insignia Pulse Oximeter with Digital Display

Verywell Health / Leticia Almeida

What Our Testers Say

“The device was a little finicky and your finger had to be in the perfect place for it to work properly. That being said, I think that its sensitivity is probably beneficial if you're looking for an accurate reading.” — Christina Oehler, Verywell editor and product tester

Best Budget: Wellue Fingertip Pulse Oximeter

5
Wellue Fingertip Pulse Oximeter

Amazon

Our Ratings
  • Setup
    5/5
  • Fit
    5/5
  • Ease of Use
    5/5
  • Data Display
    5/5
  • Overall Value
    5/5
Pros
  • Easy setup

  • Snug without being too tight

  • Sleek design

Cons
  • Some may not prefer the beeping noise

Wellue’s Fingertip Pulse Oximeter 60F was one of two of our picks to have received a score of five for all attributes. While some monitors require charging before the first use, this device was ready to use in seconds after putting in the batteries. Our tester found it versatile enough for those with various finger sizes and praised the sleek design. We also found it bright and easy to read with its OLED display. 

While it’s not a hi-tech option, it gets the job done with its no-frills design and includes features like auto on and off, spot check and continuous measuring modes, and built-in memory. Apart from O2 levels, it also tracks pulse rates, perfusion index, and pulse strength—which are more features than other low-tech options may have. And to make portability easier, the monitor includes a carry pouch and lanyard. 

The device did have a consistent beeping feature throughout the readings, which not all users may like, but this proves a small con for the affordable price and overall value.

Price at time of publication: $25

Weight: .2 pounds | Dimensions: 1.65 x 2.87 x 3.78 inches | Power Source: Battery-operated (included) | Smartphone-Compatible: No

Wellue Fingertip Pulse Oximeter

Verywell Health / Leticia Almeida

A Tip From the Lab

NOTE: Nail polish and cold hands can interfere with the results. Smoking beforehand can also lead to inaccurate readings. As always, consult with your health practitioner before purchasing a new medical device.

Best for Kids: Zacurate Digital Pediatric Finger Pulse Oximeter

4.7
Zacurate Digital Pediatric Finger Pulse Oximeter

Courtesy of Zacurate

Our Ratings
  • Setup
    5/5
  • Fit
    5/5
  • Ease of Use
    5/5
  • Data Display
    4/5
  • Overall Value
    4.5/5
Pros
  • Easy setup

  • Bright display

  • Good for kids as young as two years old

Cons
  • Too small for adult finger sizes

  • Data display could be more accessible

While you may have been hoping to share a pulse oximeter between everyone in the family, kids will need their own pulse oximeter that’s designed for small fingers. “Most pulse oximeters on the market are larger in size and meant for use on adult fingers [but] if the pulse oximeter is too loose while placed on a finger, it may be unable to obtain an accurate reading,” says Sanjeev Jain, MD, PhD. He continues, “If you are planning to use a pulse oximeter on a child or a person with frail hands, it would be best to purchase a smaller pediatric device.”

Designed for kids’ hands, the Zacurate Fingertip Pulse Oximeter likely won’t fit most adult finger sizes. As expected, our adult tester found it too tight, and was pleased with the kid-friendliness. It only takes a few seconds to place one’s finger in the device and press the “on” button. However, we recommend kids initially use the device with an adult’s assistance as they may not know how to interpret the data. This is what made it receive a four out of five for data display, though other attributes received consistent five star ratings. 

The device features a fun polar bear design that’ll hold kids’ attention and make it seem more like a fun accessory. Additionally, there are six layout options, adjustable brightness settings, and 30 hours of battery life. It also comes equipped with an infrared shield so an overly bright environment won’t interfere with the device’s sensor or results.

Price at time of publication: $55

Weight: .1 pounds | Dimensions: 2 x 1 x 1.3 inches | Power Source: Battery-operated | Smartphone-Compatible: No

Zacurate Digital Pediatric Finger Pulse Oximeter

Verywell Health / Leticia Almeida

What Our Testers Say

“This device is very easy to use. It takes a few seconds to place your finger in the device and press the on button. I think it would be easy for any kid to figure out and use regularly. It also had a cute polar bear design on the front, making it even more fun for kids.” — Christina Oehler, Verywell editor and product tester

Best with App: iHealth Air Wireless Fingertip Pulse Oximeter with Plethysmograph

4.2
iHealth Air Wireless Fingertip Pulse Oximeter with Plethysmograph
Our Ratings
  • Setup
    4.5/5
  • Fit
    3.5/5
  • Ease of Use
    4/5
  • Data Display
    5/5
  • Overall Value
    4/5
Pros
  • Hi-tech data display

  • App offers real-time updates

  • App stores long-term data

Cons
  • Charging is required before usage

  • Accuracy depends on finding the right position

Ideal if you enjoy hi-tech devices, iHealth’s Air Wireless Pulse Oximeter features smartphone and Bluetooth compatibility, allowing you to sync readings to your phone. The device also offers heart rate readings, and through the app, you can track trends over time, write notes, and share results. We were especially impressed with the data display, which was the highest-earning attribute, at five out of five stars. As you take readings, you can see your vitals changing in real time while your data can be stored in the app for long-term tracking.

The largest monitor in our list, it received the lowest score for fit, of 3.5, of all products on our list. Our tester found it a bit finicky, “I had to play around with it a bit to figure out exactly which position to keep my finger in so the device could take an accurate reading.” He continues, “If it was not in the right position, the pulse oximeter wouldn't take the reading which was a little frustrating.” Ease of use received four out of five stars as our tester needed some time to figure out the app, but after that, it was easy to use. 

Price at time of publication: $80

Weight: .5 pounds | Dimensions: 7.28 x 4.53 x 6.11 inches | Power Source: Battery-operated (included) | Smartphone-Compatible: Yes

iHealth Air Wireless Fingertip Pulse Oximeter

Verywell Health / Leticia Almeida

What Our Testers Say

“The data display on this one is amazing. You get to see your pulse and blood oxygen levels changing in real time while you take readings. It stores your data on the app too, so you can track your levels over time. This pulse oximeter is a bit finicky and takes a bit of adjusting to find the right position on your finger to take your blood oxygen level. Once you get past that and get the hang of the app, it's a very easy and user-friendly device.” — David Jean Louis, production assistant and product tester

Best Ring: Wellue O2Ring Continuous Ring Oxygen Monitor

4.7
Wellue O2Ring Continuous Ring Oxygen Monitor

Courtesy of Wellue

Our Ratings
  • Setup
    4.5/5
  • Fit
    4.5/5
  • Ease of Use
    5/5
  • Data Display
    5/5
  • Overall Value
    4.5/5
Pros
  • Accommodates a variety of finger sizes

  • App shows real-time updates

  • Portable

Cons
  • Charging is required before usage

  • Small display

  • Expensive

You may prefer a monitor that you can easily wear and that feels less like a medical device, especially if you have an affinity for watches or wearable trackers. While the most expensive item on our list, Wellue’s Viatom O2Ring is packed with versatility and various features that other options don’t have. 

The monitor is the smallest and lightest monitor in our list, due to the ring-like design—making it a good choice if you’re traveling or want to keep things light. And while most other pulse oximeters require one to stay still during readings, this ring won’t hinder daily activities and can be worn overnight or used daily. Our tester was pleasantly surprised that the reading is taken from the upper finger instead of the fingertip like most other monitors. To take out some of the manual effort, it features a vibration alarm that lets you know when low oxygen or heart rate, or high heart rates are detected. 

We praised the fit, as the ring comes with extra material that creates adjustability—allowing the ring to be shared among multiple people. We were also impressed with the compatible app, as it shows both blood oxygen percentage and heart rate in real time, stores readings, and offers the ability to set reminders for yourself. 

Price at time of publication: $180

Weight: .03 pounds | Dimensions: 1.5 x 1.2 x 1.5 inches | Power Source: Battery-operated | Smartphone-Compatible: Yes

Wellue O2 Ring Continuous Oxygen Monitor

Verywell Health / Leticia Almeida

What Our Testers Say

“I think this is a really good pulse oximeter that's easy to use and doesn't take a learning curve to figure out how to use it. It's super small and portable so it's great for traveling, and its ring shape accommodates for a variety of finger sizes. It's interesting that it takes your blood oxygen percentage from your upper finger, unlike some of the others that work on the tip of the finger.” — Christina Oehler, Verywell editor and product tester

Best No-Frills: Zacurate Pro Series 500DL Fingertip Pulse Oximeter

5
Zacurate Pro series 500DL fingertip pulse oximeter
Amazon.
Our Ratings
  • Setup
    5/5
  • Fit
    5/5
  • Ease of Use
    5/5
  • Data Display
    5/5
  • Overall Value
    5/5
Pros
  • No frills

  • Easy setup

  • Snug but not too tight

Cons
  • Doesn't offer many insights

  • Doesn’t require an app

Zacurate’s Pro Series Pulse Oximeter was one of two monitors that received a score of 5 for all attributes, making it a reliable pick. Our tester recommends this choice for those who want a no-frills option with no extra gimmicks and minimal setup. In addition to tracking blood oxygen saturation levels, it also determines pulse rate and pulse strength. We appreciated the device’s wide range in being able to accommodate a variety of finger sizes, so it can be shared among multiple people.

If you have sensitive skin, you’ll be pleased to know that the device is hypoallergenic and latex-free. Operating on batteries, which are included, and a battery life of 40 hours, the monitor signals when it’s running low. A lanyard is also included for convenience, as well as an infrared shield to protect against harsh lighting.

Price at time of publication: $23

Weight: .20 pounds | Dimensions: 1.97 x 1.97 x 0.79 inches | Power Source: Battery-operated (included) | Smartphone-Compatible: No

Zacurate Pro Series 500DL Fingertip Pulse Oximeter

Verywell Health / Leticia Almeida

What Our Testers Say

“This device was really easy to use, it only required quickly turning on the power button and it then read the readings shortly after. It's great for anyone who wants a no-frills device they can use without needing an extensive set up.” — Christina Oehler, Verywell editor and product tester

Best Display: Accare Fingertip Pulse Oximeter

4.7
Accare Fingertip Pulse Oximeter

Amazon

Our Ratings
  • Setup
    5/5
  • Fit
    4.5/5
  • Ease of Use
    5/5
  • Data Display
    4.5/5
  • Overall Value
    4.5/5
Pros
  • Easy to use

  • Clear data display

  • Doubles as a heart rate monitor

Cons
  • Better suited for smaller fingers

  • Doesn’t include an app or insights

Accare’s Pulse Oximeter didn’t receive a score below 4.5 for any attributes, ranking highest for setup and ease of use with five out of five stars. We found the setup very minimal as it only required adding batteries before being good to go, while it’s designed for one-button operation for easy use. We even found it comfortable for those who may have visual impairments as its display featured bright red numbers that are clear and readable. The display also shows when the battery is running low so you can plan ahead, though the battery life lasts up to 40 hours.

As for a few cons? Our tester doesn’t recommend this device for those with larger-than-average fingers as he found it had less adjustability than other options. The device also doesn’t offer smartphone compatibility, so it may not be the best choice if you’re looking for something more hi-tech with lots of features. Our tester would’ve liked it if there was more insight about the readings but ultimately found it a solid, no-frills option for those who want to consistently keep track of their blood oxygen levels and heart rate.

Price at time of publication: $20

Weight: .15 pounds | Dimensions: 3.3 x 2.3 x 2.1 inches | Power Source: Battery-operated (included) | Smartphone-Compatible: No

Accare Fingertip Pulse Oximeter

Verywell Health / Leticia Almeida

Compare

Overall Rating Setup Fit Ease of Use Data Display Overall Value
Insignia Pulse Oximeter with Digital Display
Best Overall:
Insignia Pulse Oximeter with Digital Display
4.9
5 5 3.5 5 4
Wellue Fingertip Pulse Oximeter
Best Budget:
Wellue Fingertip Pulse Oximeter
5
5 5 5 5 5
Zacurate Digital Pediatric Finger Pulse Oximeter
Best for Kids:
Zacurate Digital Pediatric Finger Pulse Oximeter
4.7
5 5 5 4 4.5
iHealth Air Wireless Fingertip Pulse Oximeter with Plethysmograph
Best with App:
iHealth Air Wireless Fingertip Pulse Oximeter
4.2
4.5 3.5 4 5 4
Wellue O2Ring Continuous Ring Oxygen Monitor
Best Ring:
Wellue O2Ring
4.7
4.5 4.5 5 5 4.5
Zacurate Pro series 500DL fingertip pulse oximeter
Best No-Frills:
Zacurate Pro Series 500DL
5
5 5 5 5 5
Accare Fingertip Pulse Oximeter
Best Display:
Accare Fingertip Pulse Oximeter
4.7
5 4.5 5 4.5 4.5

Final Verdict

Insignia’s Pulse Oximeter with OLED Display was easily our top choice. Despite its motion sensitivity, it offers consistent readings and a customizable display with multiple settings. If you enjoy having more features you can play around with, you can’t go wrong with Wellue’s Viatom O2Ring. It's expensive, but it doesn’t skimp on versatility—as it can be worn overnight and for daily usage.

How We Rated Pulse Oximeters

4.8 to 5 stars: These are the best pulse oximeters we tested. We recommend them without reservation.

4.5 to 4.7 stars: These pulse oximeters are excellent—they might have minor flaws, but we still recommend them.

4.0 to 4.5 stars: We think these are great pulse oximeters, but others are better.

3.5 to 3.9 stars: These pulse oximeters are just average.

3.4 and below: We don't recommend pulse oximeters with this rating; you won't find any on our list.


Best Pulse Oximeters Test

Verywell Health / Leticia Almeida

How We Tested the Pulse Oximeters

The Verywell Health team spent eight hours testing 14 pulse oximeters at The Verywell Testing Lab to see how they performed amongst a few key attributes, including setup, fit, ease of use, data display, and overall value. We chose these attributes because we believe that they are most aligned with the priorities of someone shopping for a pulse oximeter. Our testers, comprised of a Verywell Health editor and a product assistant, conducted tests under the supervision of Huma Sheikh, MD, a neurologist at Mount Sinai in New York City, via Zoom call.

Best Pulse Oximeters Test

Verywell Health / Leticia Almeida

Prior to the test, our testers were told to remove any nail polish and abstain from smoking, which may interfere with the device readings. On the day of the test, our testers took two sets of readings. The first was a resting reading, which was taken while the tester was sitting still, on both the right index finger. The second test, which came after all of the initial readings were taken, involved each tester doing 15 seconds of jumping jacks twice, then taking their blood oxygen reading on the same finger immediately after.

A Note About Accuracy

Because blood oxygen readings can fluctuate widely in response to movement, and because we did not have a medical grade pulse oximeter to compare results with, we decided we did not have the resources to give a valid accuracy rating. Instead, we determined each device’s “reading consistency”. We took recorded each reading and took the standard deviation of the four readings to determine the reading consistency.


We consulted with Dr. Sheikh, who advised that any device with a standard deviation of 10 or less would be considered consistent. Devices with standard deviations greater than 10 did not make our list.

Our testers took notes on each of the pulse oximeters tested, making note of the steps involved in setting up the device, how well the device fit their fingers, how easy the device was to use, the clarity and insights provided in each device's data display, and the device's overall value. Our testers then ranked each of these attributes on a scale of one to five, with five being the ideal rating.

iHealth Air Wireless Fingertip Pulse Oximeter

Verywell Health / Leticia Almeida

What to Look for in a Pulse Oximeter

Accuracy and Reading Consistency

In order to correctly detect your oxygen saturation, any oximeter you buy should fit securely on your finger, says Sanjeev Jain, MD, PhD, allergist and immunologist practicing at Columbia Allergy.

“Most pulse oximeters on the market are larger in size and meant for use on adult fingers [but] if the pulse oximeter is too loose while placed on a finger, it may be unable to obtain an accurate reading,” he explains. “If you are planning to use a pulse oximeter on a child or a person with frail hands, it would be best to purchase a smaller pediatric device.”

It should be noted that there is a huge variation in the accuracy of commercially available pulse oximeters. A 2018 study in the European Respiratory Journal reports that overall, commercially available pulse oximeters give an accurate reading of oxygen saturation—but how accurate varies among devices. Dass recommends testing out your personal oximeter at your doctor’s office so you can compare its readings to the ones taken by your doctor’s device.

Type

Personal Use Oximeters:

All of the pulse oximeters we tested are considered personal use oximeters. Though some doctors may hesitate to recommend that their patients use a personal oximeter given their varying degrees of accuracy, others believe it can be a useful tool as long as their patients know how to use it correctly. Dr. Mavunda says these oximeters are usually small, portable clips that fit on your finger and can be a good way to monitor your health at an affordable cost, right from your home.

Continuous Reading Oximeters:

If you’ve ever been hospitalized for respiratory distress (or, in many cases, for anything from birthing a baby to undergoing surgery), you may have been hooked up to a medical-grade oximeter that provided an ongoing picture of your oxygen saturation. 

“Doctors' offices and hospitals use sophisticated devices that provide continuous reading,” says Kunjana Mavunda, MD, a pulmonologist with Kidz Medical Services in Florida. “These devices are the size of a hardcover book and have rechargeable batteries that can last several hours.”

Infant Monitoring Oximeters:

A “smart sock” that fits over an infant’s foot, these oximeters are baby monitoring devices that tell watchful parents exactly how well their baby’s heart and lungs are performing. Typically, these devices are connected to an app on a parent’s smartphone or tablet, which gives them a continuous reading as well as alerts if their baby’s vital signs drop below preset levels. They’re often quite expensive though, Dr. Mavunda notes.

Usage

With most respiratory issues, you're going to feel a disruption in your breathing before a pulse oximeter spot check alerts you to any problems, points out Daniel Murphy, MD, assistant professor and medical director of the Section of Internal Medicine at Baylor College of Medicine. These devices are most helpful if you have more mild symptoms and then a sudden, significant drop in blood oxygen saturation. But make sure you're paying attention to any warning signs from your body first and foremost, even if your pulse oximeter doesn't set off any alarm bells.

Frequently Asked Questions

  • How does a pulse oximeter work?

    “When the heart contracts, blood is pumped out to the finger [and] when the heart is resting, blood travels from the finger to the heart; the difference in this velocity is used to measure the oxygen saturation in the blood," says Kunjana Mavunda, MD, a pulmonologist with Kidz Medical Services in Florida.

    Dr. Mavunda explains that pulse oximeters work by reading oxygen saturation in the blood by detecting both the volume of blood in the finger as well as the differences in light absorption between oxygenated and deoxygenated blood.

  • What is a good pulse oximeter reading?

    Before you run out and buy a pulse oximeter, you should consult with your doctor. However, there is a standard range of normal when it comes to saturation readings, your specific range may vary based on your medical condition.

    “A pulse oximeter reading of an oxygen saturation more than 90% is good for most people,” says Dr. Dass. “However, [a 2015] study showed that patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with an oxygen saturation less than 95% have a higher risk of exacerbation [of symptoms].”

    In other words, a pulse oximeter reading isn’t one size fits all: most healthy people hover between 95 and 100%—and most doctors will want to hear from you if your saturation falls below 92%, warns Dr. Dass—but ideally you would use an oximeter at home with oversight from your physician. 

  • Which finger should a pulse oximeter be used on?

    The finger you place your pulse oximeter on can affect the quality of your reading.

    “We typically place a pulse oximeter on the right middle finger to get the most accurate information about a patient’s blood oxygen content, tissue perfusion, and heart beat rate,” says Rachel Medbery, MD, thoracic surgeon with Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgeons.

    If you can’t use your right middle finger, the next best option is your right thumb, which has also been shown to provide better results than other digits.

  • How accurate are home pulse oximeters?

    It depends on what type of oximeter you’re using and what you’re planning to use it for, says Dr. Medbery. 

    “Over-the-counter pulse oximeters either sold online or in pharmacies, without a prescription from your doctor, [are] not FDA reviewed and should not be used for professional medical purposes,” she says, though she adds that they’re safe for basic spot-checks at home. 

    Prescription pulse oximeters go through rigorous testing and review by the FDA; while these are typically used in doctor’s offices, Dr. Medbery says sometimes doctors will prescribe them for at-home use in their patients.

    Either way, though, it’s important to understand the limitations of these devices. Dr. Medbery says movement, temperature, and nail polish can impact the accuracy.

  • How do you read a pulse oximeter?

    According to Dr. Medbery, a normal level of oxygen saturation (SpO2) in your blood is usually 95 percent or more, though “some people with chronic lung disease or sleep apnea can have normal levels around 90 percent.”

    Your oximeter should have a clear place where the SpO2 reading is displayed, which will show you the percentage of oxygen in your blood. Unless your provider has told you otherwise, an SpO2 reading of lower than 95 percent warrants communication with your provider ASAP. 

    Keep in mind that your SpO2 reading is just one measurement of your oxygen saturation, and how you feel (or, more accurately, how easily you can breathe) is important, too. If your oximeter shows a low oxygen saturation, you should contact your provider right away—but OTC or prescription, these devices shouldn’t be used as the only barometer for getting help.

    “If your pulse oximeter...gives a normal reading but you do not feel well, you should seek medical attention,” advises Dr. Medbery.

    A South African study found that pulse oximeters proved beneficial for high-risk patients that tested positive for COVID-19, with findings of decreased fatality in patients that tracked their oxygen at home versus those who didn’t.  

Best Pulse Oximeters Test

Verywell Health / Leticia Almeida

Why Trust Verywell Health

Tori Zhou is the Associate Health Commerce Editor at Verywell. She enjoys staying up-to-date on wellness trends and products, with a focus on holistic health.

Additional reporting to this story by Sarah Bradley

Sarah Bradley has been writing health content since 2017—everything from product roundups and illness FAQs to nutrition explainers and the dish on diet trends. She knows how important it is to receive trustworthy and expert-approved advice about over-the-counter products that manage everyday health conditions, from GI issues and allergies to chronic headaches and joint pain.

5 Sources
Verywell Health uses only high-quality sources, including peer-reviewed studies, to support the facts within our articles. Read our editorial process to learn more about how we fact-check and keep our content accurate, reliable, and trustworthy.
  1. FDA. Pulse Oximeter Accuracy and Limitations: FDA Safety Communication. February 19, 2021.

  2. Mcdermott R, Liddicoat H, Moore A, et al. Evaluating the accuracy of commercially available finger pulse oximeters in a hospital settingEuropean Respiratory Journal. 2018;52 (suppl 62). doi:10.1183/13993003.congress-2018.PA4452

  3. Dalbak LG, Straand J, Melbye H. Should pulse oximetry be included in GPs' assessment of patients with obstructive lung disease?Scand J Prim Health Care. 2015;33(4):305-310. doi:10.3109/02813432.2015.1117283

  4. Basaranoglu G, Bakan M, Umutoglu T, Zengin SU, Idin K, Salihoglu Z. Comparison of SpO2 values from different fingers of the handsSpringerplus. 2015;4:561. doi:10.1186/s40064-015-1360-5

  5. Nematswerani N, Collie S, Chen T, et al. The impact of routine pulse oximetry use on outcomes in COVID-19-infected patients at increased risk of severe disease: a retrospective cohort analysis. SSRN Journal.